pederasty

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Related to Paiderastia: paederastic

pederasty

 [ped″er-as´te]
anal intercourse between a man and a boy.

ped·er·as·ty

(ped'ĕr-as'tē),
Homosexual anal intercourse, especially when practiced on boys.
[G. paiderastia; fr. pais (paid-), boy, + eraō, to long for]

pederasty

Psychiatry Homosexual anal intercourse between men–active partners and boys–passive partners. See Ephebophilia, NAMBLA, Pedophilia.

ped·er·as·ty

(pe'dĕr-as-tē)
Sexual relations between a man and a boy.
Synonym(s): paederasty.
[G. paiderastia; fr. pais (paid-), boy, + eraō, to long for]

pederasty

Anal intercourse, especially with a boy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, Catullus' poetry presents its readers with two relationships disapproved by traditional Roman standards: one with the free-born youth Juventius, the other with the married woman whom he calls Lesbia.(67) The relationship with Juventius is on the model of Greek paiderastia, yet Catullus does not capitalise on that fact by endowing the Juventius poems with more of a `Greek' colouring than he gives the Lesbia poems.(68) Virgil's second Eclogue (on Corydon's love for Alexis) is neither more nor less Greek in feel than his tenth (on Gallus' love for Lycoris).
Far from passing over paiderastia in a shocked or censorious silence, he includes it in his prefatory discussion of Greek customs (pr.
Nor did paiderastia play a prominent role in the agonal relationship between Roman and Greek cultural traditions; no Roman sources condemn `the Greek vice'.
Here, Hedwig suggests that modern appropriations of paiderastia are doomed to failure.
Hedwig's critique of American versions of Athenian paiderastia continues when Hedwig meets her next lover, Tommy, by highlighting the ways in which the age differences in ancient practice do not map onto current erotic configurations.
(Kass 2000, 29; emphasis added) Note Kass's preference for the word "pederasty," a highly misleading rendition of paiderastia, which evokes various visceral modern prejudices concerning homosexuality and its Greek 'origins.' What we may see throughout his life's work is a reader clearly enamored of Aristophanes' speech, yet unwilling to acknowledge the central importance of its queer content.