Page kidney

Page kidney

(pāj)
Compression of a kidney, usually by a hematoma or tumor, with resulting hypertension.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cause of both conditions is suggested to be the compression of the renal parenchyma by subcapsular collection, which results in increased erythropoietin and renin secretion due to ischaemic kidney (page kidney).
Page kidney is a phenomenon first described by Irving Page in 1939.
Page kidney, a phenomenon whereby external compression of renal parenchyma induces hypertension and decreased renal function in renal transplant patients, is an unusual complication of renal transplant biopsies despite the high number of renal transplant biopsies performed.
In a similar case of recurrent, solitary Page kidney, (4) initial conservative radiologic management via percutaneous drainage of the subcapsular renal hematoma (along with sclerosing attempts) failed, leading to eventual definitive management requiring embolization.
Recurrent Page kidney in a child with a congenital solitary kidney requiring capsular artery embolization.
She had no more recurrence of Page Kidney phenomenon and her antihypertensive regime is managed successfully as an outpatient.
The hypertensive state of patient was supposed secondary to peripheral capsulo-cortical ischemia due to external compressive effect by chronic lymphatic collection (Page Kidney).
Potential late complications include retroperitoneal fibrosis and Page kidney.
Page kidney is defined as the external compression of the kidney, typically by a subcapsular hematoma, that leads to hypertension due to hypoperfusion and ischemia.
One patient had an ischemic kidney (page kidney) from compression and developed hypertension.[sup.17] Essential hypertension still accounts for most cases of high blood pressure.
In addition, the enlarged polycystic kidneys may have also caused compression of the transplant kidney leading to a "Page kidney." This phenomenon was first described in an experiment by Irwin Page in 1939, where canine kidneys were wrapped in cellophane to induce arterial hypertension via activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway.[sup.9] A Page kidney, however, alone would not explain the radiographical findings on US.