pacifier

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pacifier

(pas'i-fī-ĕr),
An object, usually of hard plastic or some other material permitting sterilization, which is sucked by a nursing infant for solace.
[pacify, fr. M.E. pacifien, pacify, fr. O.Fr., fr. L. pacificare, to pacify, + -er]

pacifier

[pas′ifī′ər]
Etymology: L, pacificare, to bring peace
1 an agent that soothes or comforts.
2 a nipple-shaped object used by infants and children for sucking. The safest pacifiers are constructed in one piece, are large enough that only the nipple fits into the mouth, and have a handle that can be easily grasped. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends waiting to introduce a pacifier until a baby is 1 month old and breastfeeding is well established.

pacifier

(pas′ĭ-fī″ĕr)
A nipple, usually made of a synthetic material, , provided for infants to satisfy their need to suck.
References in periodicals archive ?
Offer the pacifier at nap time and bedtime, just when putting the child down for sleep.
Manufactured by Denmark-based Hevea, the pacifier is made of 100 % natural rubber.
2006) Should pacifiers be recommended to prevent sudden infant death syndrome?
A direct relationship between short breastfeeding duration and increased prevalence of non-nutritive sucking habits, especially pacifier use, has been reported.
Aim: The aim of the study was to monitor the pattern of release and salivary xylitol concentrations during sucking of a slow-release pacifier used to deliver a novel food supplement.
Evaluation of the effects of orthodontic pacifiers on the primary dentitions of 24 to 59 month old children: preliminary study.
Recent data from six studies suggest that pacifier use significantly reduces the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), John Kattwinkel, M.
OUTCOME MEASURED Survival analysis (using Cox proportional hazards model) assessed the time covariate effects of pacifier use, digit sucking, and child care attendance on cessation of breastfeeding, while adjusting for other possible confounding variables (not planning to breastfeed, maternal smoking, infants' sex and antibiotic use, maternal and paternal age and education, and income group).
Phthalate ester, widely used to soften vinyl chloride and as a plasticizer, has been found in babies' pacifiers and teething rings in Japan.
Researchers concluded that the babies who used pacifiers nursed less often and for shorter periods of time.
Natural latex rubber is found in medical products and equipment, such as dental supplies, syringes, catheters, stethoscopes, hemodialysis equipment, and ventilator equipment, and in common household products such as pacifiers, baby bottle nipples, balloons, pencil erasers, automobile tires, and carpeting.
Those bubble-shaped "orthodontically correct" pacifiers are apparently no better than the old-fashioned ones, according to a report in the January-February 1992 issue of Pediatric Dentistry.