pacifier

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pacifier

(pas'i-fī-ĕr),
An object, usually of hard plastic or some other material permitting sterilization, which is sucked by a nursing infant for solace.
[pacify, fr. M.E. pacifien, pacify, fr. O.Fr., fr. L. pacificare, to pacify, + -er]

pacifier

(pas′ĭ-fī″ĕr)
A nipple, usually made of a synthetic material, , provided for infants to satisfy their need to suck.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Eliane Abou-Jaoude She says: "Our study looked at infants and the method in which their pacifier was cleaned: Sterilisation (boiling, placing in a dishwasher), washing with hands and soap, or by the parent sucking on the pacifier and giving it to their children.
This pacifier is another favorite as it is made to stay put in your baby's mouth.
These data suggest that early pacifier use doesn't interfere with breastfeeding success.
It also proved babies could breathe clearly while using the our pacifier without the need to cry due to lack of oxygen," added Smith.
In the 4th month, mother's employment status and pacifier use remained significant in the adjusted analysis, and the risk of consuming milk formulas was 1.63 times higher in children whose mothers worked (CI95% - 1.14-2.35) and 1.72 times greater in children who used pacifiers (CI95% - 1.18-2.51) (Table 2).
The symbolic and utilitarian facets of pacifiers according to mothers.
Mother-described calm/easy-to-care-for/independent infant characteristics were common among children who had used or were still using a pacifier. This result and the reports about the motivation for offering a pacifier were consistent with those of other studies in which mothers justified introducing pacifiers to calm their infants (Mauch et al.
"Pacifier Sanitizer is a major convenience for parents: Instead of boiling to sanitize a new or dirty pacifier, now just spray CleanSmart Pacifier Sanitizer, wait 60 seconds, and give it back to the baby.
The use by hospitals of pacifiers, or artificial teats, is not allowed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children's Fund (Unicef) in its Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative, which hospitals in the Philippines are supposed to adhere to.
In a related development, another mother came out in Facebook and posted a picture of her newborn child whose mouth was taped to hold a pacifier in place while confined at the CPCMHI.
Washington, May 8 ( ANI ): Parents who suck on their infants' pacifiers may protect their children against developing allergies, a new study has revealed.
I've decided to share some of my observations on pacifiers. If we had been asked prior to parenthood if we planned to offer our babies pacifiers, I'm sure Marilyn and I would have answered, "Definitely not!