Pacific yew


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Related to Pacific yew: western yew, Taxol

Pacific yew

n.
A yew (Taxus brevifolia) of western North America having bark that is a natural source of the drug paclitaxel.
References in periodicals archive ?
As I approached the South Fork of the Trinity River at a place called Hellgate, where Kauffmann teases "some of the largest specimens of Pacific yew" live, hillsides of scattered live oak wrinkled in summer heat, and I couldn't think of anything but reaching the cool green water.
And, in another fortunate turn of events, scientists discovered ways to commercially produce paclitaxel--preserving Pacific yew trees (one of the world's slowest growing trees) as well as our Fitness Farm shrubs pictured below.
It consists of Douglas fir, western red cedar, Sitka spruce and Pacific yew trees.
Several decades ago, for example, scientists found a compound in the bark of the Pacific yew tree that helps fight cancer.
In the 1980s, it was discovered that paclitaxel--a drug produced from the bark of the Pacific yew and now marketed under the name Taxol--was effective in controlling lung, breast and ovarian cancers.
government-funded organization learned that the bark of the Pacific yew (taxus brevifolia) contained paclitaxel, an anticarcinogenic substance, and put this data into the public domain.
The past few decades have seen the development of yet another important drug: paclitaxel (registered as Taxol by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company) from the bark of the Pacific yew tree (Taxus brevifolia).
Other isoprenoids include the flavoring menthol, carotenoids (useful for combating ultraviolet damage), and Taxol (an anticancer agent derived from the Pacific yew).
Taxol is a potent--and expensive--anti-cancer substance found on the bark of the Pacific Yew tree that unnecessarily threatens the extinction of these trees.
Worldwide sales of Taxol, which is derived from the bark and needles of the rare and slow-growing Pacific Yew tree, were approximately $1.6 billion in 2000.
Taxol was first discovered in the bark and needles of the Pacific yew, an evergreen tree native to old-growth forests of the Pacific Northwest.
Pacific yew, so elegant below the towering cedars and firs.

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