phosphate

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phosphate

 [fos´fāt]
any salt or ester of phosphoric acid. adj., adj phosphat´ic.

Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine, and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), take part in a series of reversible reactions involving phosphoric acid, lactic acid, glycogen, and other substances, which furnish the energy expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine, and certain other body compounds.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phos·phate (P),

(fos'fāt),
A salt or ester of phosphoric acid. For individual phosphates not listed here, see under the name of the base.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

phos·phate

(fos'fāt)
1. A salt or ester (especially inorganic) of phosphoric acid.
2. The trivalent ion, PO43-.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

phosphate

any salt or ester of any PHOSPHORIC ACID.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Phosphate

An organic compound necessary for mineralization of bone and other key cellular processes.
Mentioned in: Hyperparathyroidism
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.