PFO


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PFO

Abbreviation for:
patent foramen ovale  
perfluorooctane
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There is a growing body of data suggesting that an isolated PFO or ASA is not associated with increased risk of primary stroke, and no specific treatment is typically needed in someone who is asymptomatic.
This vortex formed at the right atrium entrance is thought to remove the blood out of PFO which carries the majority of thrombus material, bubble, vasoactive chemicals and which is coming with the inferior caval current directed at almost to the fossa ovalis at the beginning which (7,8).
According to the PFO, in many cases the forests were also set ablaze to give more work to the people, as the forestry department salvaged burnt material for timber.
"However, if one has a PFO and that clot crosses the PFO and goes to the left side of the heart, it can go to the brain and cause a stroke."
"Our panel believes that the mechanism of benefit with PFO closure is prevention of venous clots crossing the PFO.
Most people with a PFO, a hole occurring in the upper wall between the left and right atria of the heart, do not experience any issues when blood flows from one atrium to the other; however, serious problems including stroke can arise if a blood clot passes from the right to left atria through a PFO and then to the brain.
There are few data on the mechanism of recurrent neurological events after transcatheter closure of PFO in CS or TIA.
Paradoxical embolism originating from a venous source has been identified as a potential cause of stroke/TIA in patients with PFO. The association of paradoxical embolism and cryptogenic stroke/TIA is backed up by the fact that a higher prevalence of PFO has been documented in patients with cryptogenic stroke (up to 56%) as compared to the general population (20 to 26%) [4-7].
We report the first case in literature associating PFO and acute transitory audiovestibular loss, which occurred in a male who had had an ischemic mesencephalic stroke several months ago.
In patients in whom PAVM and patent foramen ovale (PFO) coexist, both conditions may be responsible for paradoxical embolism.