patient-controlled analgesia

(redirected from PCA pump)

pa·tient-con·trolled an·al·ges·i·a (PCA),

a method for control of pain based on use of a pump for the constant intravenous or, less frequently, epidural infusion of a dilute narcotic solution that includes a mechanism for the self-administration at predetermined intervals of a predetermined amount of the narcotic solution if the infusion fails to relieve pain.

patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)

a drug-delivery system that dispenses a preset intravascular dose of a narcotic analgesic when the patient pushes a switch on an electric cord. The device consists of a computerized pump with a chamber containing the drug. The patient administers a dose of narcotic intravenously when the need for pain relief arises. A lockout interval automatically inactivates the system if a patient tries to increase the amount of narcotic within a preset period.
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Patient-controlled analgesia infusion pump

patient-controlled analgesia

Pain management A method for self-administration of narcotic-analgesics via a programmable pump; PCA is used for pain of terminal CA, postsurgery, angina pectoris, L&D Agents Fentanil, meperidine, morphine, sufentanil; PCA is delivered IV, subcutaneously or epidurally. See Pain.

pa·tient-con·trolled an·al·ge·si·a

(PCA) (pā'shĕnt kŏn-trōld' an'ăl-jē'zē-ă)
A method for control of pain based on use of a pump for the constant intravenous or, less frequently, epidural infusion of a diluted narcotic solution that includes a mechanism for the self-administration at predetermined intervals of the narcotic solution should the infusion fail to relieve pain.

patient-controlled analgesia

A method of pain control in which the patient cooperates. An intravenous drip is set up and the patient has a small control unit with a button which, when pressed, inserts a small dose of a drug such as morphine, into the infusion fluid. Overdosage cannot occur. A disadvantage is the need to urinate at frequent intervals.

pa·tient-con·trolled an·al·ge·si·a

, patient-controlled anesthesia(PCA) (pā'shĕnt kŏn-trōld' an'ăl-jē'zē-ă, an'es-thē'zē-ă)
Method for control of pain using a pump for constant intravenous or epidural infusion of a dilute narcotic solution that includes a mechanism for self-administration at predetermined intervals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Postoperative use of paracetamol through PCA pump achieved better pain control and pain management versus postoperative use of intermittent paracetamol analgesia after lumbar discectomy.
These attempts addressed multiple issues affecting safety of PCA pump, including mechanical plant, operator errors and patient pharmacokinetic differences; however neither of these studies accounted for drug demand variability originating from the individuality of each patient.
However, the facilities and equipment like PCA pump needed for PCEA may be more expensive than pump required for CEI.
It's the first and only PCA pump with integrated bar code identification of prefilled and pharmacy-filled drug vials, substantially eliminating the potential for drug and concentration errors at the bedside.
The PCA pump settings are checked independently by two nurses against the written medical order, validating the Five Rights and the carrier solution (NIHCC, 2011).
An ALARIS[R] PCA pump (ALARIS Medical UK Ltd, Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK), capable of a bolus delivery over 20 to 40 seconds was used and a bolus limit of 70 [micro]g set to prevent the administration of dangerously high boluses.
PCA pump medication totals are cleared and recorded every 8 hours.
The only case of narcotic overdose I have seen with a PCA pump is when a parent kept pushing the button long after the child's pain relief had been achieved.
This scale was used extensively by nurses at this hospital for patients using the PCA pump to self-administer opioids.