PC-SPES

PC-SPES

(pē-sē-spēs′)
A mixture of herbs (chrysanthemum, Ganoderma lucidum, isatis, licorice, Panax pseudo-ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens, saw palmetto, and scutellaria) with estrogen-like effects. The mixture was formerly promoted as an alternative therapy for prostate cancer. It has been taken off the market in the U.S. because of contamination and adulteration with pharmaceuticals.
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PC-SPES consists of powders derived from 8 herbs: Dendranthema morifolium, Isatis indigotica, Panax ginseng, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa repens, Scutellaria baicalensis, Rabdosia rubescens, and Glycyrrhiza glabra.
Prospective, multicenter, randomized phase II trial of the herbal supplement, PC-SPES, and diethylstilbestrol in patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer.
Herbal products may even be adulterated with prescription drugs, as recently reported for the Chinese herbal formula PC-SPES (2).
The product, called PC-SPES, has since been recalled by its California-based manufacturer, BotanicLab, which has gone out of business.
If you take either of the herbal supplements known as PC-SPES and SPES, stop their use immediately.
Researchers are more confident that a mixture of seven herbs called PC-SPES may slow advanced cancer in men who have no other treatments available.
The PC-SPES capsule - made from eight Chinese herbs - significantly lowers levels of PSA protein in the blood, which is linked to the cancer.
Scientists at the University of California found that the supplement, known as PC-SPES, capsules significantly lower levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a protein in the blood closely linked to the cancer.
Anecdotal reports have suggested that PC-SPES, a commercially available combination of eight herbal extracts, lowers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men who have received prior treatment but whose PSA levels continue to rise.
PC-Spes. PC-Spes is an herbal combination which consists of chrysanthemum, isatis, licorice, saw palmetto, skullcap, and others.
The NIH National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) has halted studies that were to be conducted on the herbal supplement PC-SPES, which was recalled earlier this year.
PSA levels in the hormone dependent men fell by more than 80 per cent after taking the supplement, known as PC-SPES.