os

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Related to PC-DOS: Microsoft DOS, DOS versions

OS

 (L.)
o´culus sinis´ter (left eye).

OS

The JCAHO directs that left eye be written in full to avoid confusion with similar abbreviations.
Abbreviation for L. oculus sinister, left eye.

Os

(oz),
Symbol for osmium.

os

, gen.

o·'ris

, pl.

o·ra

(oz, ō'ris, ō'ră), Do not confuse this word with os, ossis 'bone'.
1. The mouth.
2. Term applied sometimes to an opening into a hollow organ or canal, especially one with thick or fleshy edges.

See also: mouth (2), ostium, orifice, opening.
[L. mouth]

os 1

(ōs)
n. pl. ora (ôr′ə)
A mouth or an opening.

os 2

(ŏs)
n. pl. ossa (ŏs′ə)
A bone.

OS

Abbreviation for:
oculus sinister (left eye)
obese strain
observational study
occupational safety
office surgery
oligosaccharide
Omenn syndrome
opening snap
Opitz syndrome
oral solution
ordnance survey  
organ specific
Osgood-Schlatter
osteosarcoma
osteosclerosis
outer segment
overall survival
overlap syndrome
oxidative stress
oxygen saturation

OS

Symbol for
1. Occupational safety.
2. Oculus sinister–left eye.
3. Opening snap.
4. Operating system.
5. Oral surgery.
6. Order sheet.
7. Osgood-Schlatter's disease.
8. Osteogenic sarcoma.
9. Osteosclerosis.
10. Oxygen saturation.

Os

Symbol for osmium.

os

, gen. oris, pl. ora (os, ō'ris, -ă) [TA]
1. [TA] The mouth.
2. Term applied sometimes to an opening into a hollow organ or canal, especially one with thick or fleshy edges.
[L. mouth]

os

A bone or a mouth.

os

  1. the technical name for a bone.
  2. a mouth or mouth-like part.

Os

Symbol for osmium
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