polybrominated diphenyl ethers

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polybrominated diphenyl ethers

(pōl″ē-brōm′ĭ-nāt″ĕd),

PBDE

A class of chemicals used as flame retardants. They are chemically related to polychlorinated biphenyls and are thought to have similar biological toxicity. They have been found in streams, marine animals, human fetuses, and human breast milk.
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In humans, results are conflicting as to whether postnatal PBDE exposure is related to childhood obesity (Lim et al.
Researchers say their results confirm earlier studies that found PBDEs, which are routinely found in pregnant women and children, may be developmental neurotoxicants.
Earlier studies found that children from the CHAMACOS group had PBDE blood concentrations seven times higher than children living in Mexico.
According to national health data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly all of us have one type of PBDE in our blood; 60% of us have an additional four PBDEs.
Fire retardants of the earlier generation, known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, were added to household products such as furniture, electronics and carpeting to reduce fire-related injuries.
Studies have shown that toddlers typically have three times as much PBDEs in their blood as their mothers, and EWG found 11 different types of flame retardants.
There was even a lower incidence of flame retardant PBDE in Volvo's models than in most other cars, which according to the research institute makes Volvo a world leader in the area of interior air quality.
Even in a Michigan case, where the substance was accidentally mixed in feedstock and fed directly to cows, this meat and milk went to the human food chain, and there is little evidence of detrimental effects--only a measurable difference in PBDE levels in the cows and humans.
This low-viscosity, liquid bromine/phosphorus compound is used at similar or slightly higher dosages than PBDE and is a bit pricier.
Despite such findings, the EU recently decided to allow the continued use of one type of PBDE, "deca", although a ban on "penta" and "octa" comes into force on Sunday.