polybrominated diphenyl ethers

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polybrominated diphenyl ethers

(pōl″ē-brōm′ĭ-nāt″ĕd),

PBDE

A class of chemicals used as flame retardants. They are chemically related to polychlorinated biphenyls and are thought to have similar biological toxicity. They have been found in streams, marine animals, human fetuses, and human breast milk.
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Few studies have investigated early-life exposure in human populations; however, prenatal PBDE exposures have been inversely associated with birth weight and body mass index (BMI) in newborn infants in some (Chao et al.
Thomas Sanderson of the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands and his coworkers measured the enzyme's activity in cells that had been incubated with various PBDEs or with breakdown products created as the body attempts to rid itself of PBDEs.
In the present study, we used repeated serum measures to assess the association between PBDE exposure and thyroid function in a longitudinal cohort of healthy adults.
PBDEs leach from treated products and have become ubiquitous, including in the bodies of people (SN: 10/13/01, p.
The need for conducting mixture risk assessment (MRA) derives from evidence that humans, at all life stages, come into contact with PBDE mixtures.
Researchers say their results confirm earlier studies that found PBDEs, which are routinely found in pregnant women and children, may be developmental neurotoxicants.
Earlier studies found that children from the CHAMACOS group had PBDE blood concentrations seven times higher than children living in Mexico.
According to national health data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly all of us have one type of PBDE in our blood; 60% of us have an additional four PBDEs.
Studies have shown that toddlers typically have three times as much PBDEs in their blood as their mothers, and EWG found 11 different types of flame retardants.
In 2001, investigators in Sweden fed young mice a PBDE mixture similar to one used in furniture and found that they did poorly on tests of learning, memory, and behaviour--research that was confirmed in a recent study conducted in Maine.
Further, Estonia still has no waste incineration facilities, which would act as substantial sources at preventing PCB and PBDE pollution.
The ban, however, failed to include DecaBDE--the only commercially available PBDE mixture in Canada.