tyramine

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tyramine

 [ti´rah-mēn]
a decarboxylation product of tyrosine, which may be converted to cresol and phenol, found in decayed animal tissue, ripe cheese, and ergot. Closely related structurally to epinephrine and norepinephrine, it has a similar but weaker action.

ty·ra·mine

(tī'ră-mēn, tir'ă-),
Decarboxylated tyrosine, a sympathomimetic amine having an action in some respects resembling that of epinephrine; present in ergot, mistletoe, ripe cheese, beer, red wine, and putrefied animal matter; elevated in people with tyrosinemia type II.

tyramine

(tī′rə-mēn′)
n.
A colorless crystalline amine, C8H11NO, found in mistletoe, putrefied animal tissue, certain cheeses, and ergot and also produced synthetically, used in medicine as a sympathomimetic agent.

tyramine

[tī′rəmēn]
Etymology: Gk, tyros, cheese, amine, ammonia
an amino acid synthesized in the body from the essential amino acid tyrosine. Tyramine stimulates the release of the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine. People taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors should avoid the ingestion of foods and beverages containing tyramine, particularly aged cheeses and meats, bananas, yeast-containing products, and certain alcoholic beverages, such as red wines. See also amine, catecholamine, epINEPHrine, norepinephrine, sympathomimetic, vasoconstriction.

ty·ra·mine

(tī'ră-mēn)
Decarboxylated tyrosine, a sympathomimetic amine having an action in some respects resembling that of epinephrine; present in ergot, mistletoe, ripe cheese, beer, red wine, and putrefied animal matter; elevated in people with tyrosinemia type II.

ty·ra·mine

(TYR) (tī'ră-mēn, tir'ă-)
Decarboxylated tyrosine, a sympathomimetic amine having an action in some respects resembling that of epinephrine; present in ergot, mistletoe, ripe cheese, beer, red wine, and putrefied animal matter.

tyramine (tī´rəmēn´),

n an amino acid synthesized in the body from the essential acid tyrosine. Tyramine stimulates the release of the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine. It is important that people taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors avoid the ingestion of foods and beverages containing tyramine, particularly aged cheese, meats, bananas, yeast-containing products, and alcoholic beverages.

tyramine

1. a decarboxylation product of tyrosine, which may be converted to cresol and phenol, found in decayed animal tissue, ripe cheese, and ergot. Closely related structurally to epinephrine and norepinephrine, it has a similar but weaker action.
2. N-methyl-β-phenylethylamine, a toxic amine found in Acacia berlandieri and mistletoes.