P pulmonale

P pul·mo·na·le

(pul'mō-nā'lē), The final e is not silent.
Tall, narrow, peaked P waves in electrocardiographic leads II, III, and aVF, and often a prominent initial positive P wave component in V1, presumed to be characteristic of cor pulmonale. (Although this term is extensively used in the electrocardiographic literature, it is actually a misnomer and should be more appropriately called P-dextrocardiale, because it results from overload of the right atrium regardless of the cause, as in tricuspid stenosis, and may occur independently of cor pulmonale.) In lung disease, P pulmonale is usually transient, occurring during exacerbations, usually asthmatic.

P pulmonale

A sharply peaked P wave on EKG, which is a nonspecific finding that may be found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and is most prominent during exacerbation of clinical disease. Other EKG findings in COPD include a right axis shift, early R waves in the precordial leads V1 and V2, and net negativity in V5 and V6.

'P' pulmonale

Cardiology A sharply peaked P wave on EKG, which is a relatively nonspecific finding of COPD, most prominent during exacerbation of clinical disease. See Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

P pul·mo·na·le

(pul-mō-nā'lē)
Tall, narrow, peaked P waves in electrocardiographic leads II, III, and aVF, and often a prominent initial positive P wave component in V1; it is characteristic of right atrial enlargement such as occurs in pulmonary disease and tricuspid stenosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with ECG findings of either P wave amplitude >2.5 mm or peaked P wave were considered as criteria for P pulmonale. RVH is defined by one or more of the following criteria:
By multivariate analysis also ECG changes of p pulmonale and right ventricular hypertrophy were found to be independent predictors of mortality in patients with COPD acute exacerbations (p value<0.05) Table 3
Among the ECG changes studied, premature atrial contraction (p = 0.008), right axis deviation (p < 0.001), indeterminate axis (p = 0.001), incomplete right bundle brunch block (p = 0.02), late R in aVR (p = 0.001), qR in V1 (p = 0.02), and P pulmonale (p = 0.03) were significantly more common in patients with PS than in those with major PE.
For Group II patients, this is an O2 saturation of 89% or an arterial pO2 between 56-59 torr as long as they also have a secondary diagnosis of either pedal edema, polycythemia, a history of CHF or "p pulmonale" (an elevated p wave > 3 mm in lead II, III or AVF that is associated with cor pulmonale).
The common ECG changes seen in the present study were- Right axis deviation (28%), Incomplete RBBB (12%) and P Pulmonale (34%).
34% of persons have ECG evidence of p Pulmonale. According to ATS, they are candidates for long term home Oxygen at a higher Sa[O.sub.2] level.
Out of 60 patients, 58 patients were showing p pulmonale (tall peak p wave of [greater than or equal to] 2.5 mm).
In severe COPD, one of five subjects had P pulmonale (20%).
The most common RVH criteria in these patients was right axis deviation, present in 100% of the patients, followed by R/S in V 5/6 < 1 in 90%.48% 0f the patients in this study had P pulmonale. Low voltage complexes and poor progression of R wave, which are characteristic ECG changes in emphysema were found in 28% and 32% of the patients respectively.1 patient had complete RBBB(right bundle branch block), and 1 had multiple atrial ectopics.
Table 12: ECG Findings Finding No of cases Percentage P pulmonale 35 70 Right axis deviation 32 64 Right ventricular hypertrophy 23 46 RBBB 13 26 Low voltage complex 25 50 Arrhythmias 26 52 P pulmonale and right axis deviation were the most common findings.