oxyphil cell

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ox·y·phil cell

cells of the parathyroid gland that increase in number with age; the cytoplasm contains numerous mitochondria and stains with eosin. Similar cells, and tumors composed of them, are found in salivary glands and the thyroid gland; in the latter, also called Hürthle cell.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ox·y·phil cell

(ok'sē-fil sel)
Cell of the parathyroid gland that increases in number with age; the cytoplasm contains numerous mitochondria and stains with eosin. Similar cells, and tumors composed of them, are found in salivary glands and the thyroid; in the latter, also called Hürthle cell.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
[2,3] It has been clearly known that two types of epithelial cells of parenchyma are the chief cells and oxyphil cells. [5,7,9,10] In the present study, these parenchymal cells were found to be arranged in irregular anastomosing cords or sheets adjacent to vascular channels.
Oxyphil cells are the second type of parenchymal cells in parathyroid glands of certain animal groups and humans.
In younger age groups oxyphil cells were few in number, arranged singly or in pairs between chief cells.
The number of oxyphil cells showed a gradual increase up to 40 years (0.1%--2.8%) and a rapid rise thereafter (6% 13.64%).
(1939) (9) studied parathyroid tissues in great details from 428 autopsied cases and observed oxyphil cells having acidophilic granular cytoplasm.
(19 5 7) (22) stated that mitotic figures are seen in the oxyphil cells. Bevelander G.
C(1984) (26) that oxyphil cells may represent a non-secretary stage in life cycle of chief cells.
(1996) (28) reported that the oxyphil cells are the result of proliferation of mitochondria in the chief cells.