oxycodone

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oxycodone

 [ok″se-ko´dōn]
an opioid analgesic derived from morphine; used in the form of the hydrochloride and terephthalate salts, administered orally or rectally.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ox·y·co·done

(ok'sē-kō'dōn),
A narcotic analgesic often prepared with aspirin or acetaminophen.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

oxycodone

(ŏk′sĭ-kō′dōn′)
n.
A semisynthetic opioid drug, C18H21NO4, used in its hydrochloride form as a pain reliever, often in combination with nonopioid analgesics such as acetaminophen.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

oxycodone

Hillbilly heroin, poor man's heroin, redneck heroin Pharmacology An oral opioid analgesic, which may be coadministered with other analgesics Pharmacologic effects Morphine-like actions; blocks CNS responses to pain; CNS depressant; analgesic. See Opioids, OxyContin.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ox·y·co·done

(ok'sē-kō'dōn)
A narcotic analgesic often prepared with aspirin or acetaminophen.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Six supported the provincial government's decision to leave OxyNEO unfunded, thereby restricting accessibility through the Exceptional Access Program.
I don't really think I had any problems at all with my patients going from OxyContin to OxyNEO. (MD6)
Two physicians perceived an association between unsatisfactory outcomes to illegitimate use of the medication by patients and expressed concerns for patients who found switching to a different painkiller problematic, stating that equivalent relief should be obtained with other medications, particularly OxyNEO.
These included the lack of access to OxyNEO and the cost to those without drug plans, the abruptness of the discontinuation, and the short period that was allowed for physicians to switch patients to other pain medications.
The introduction in 2010 of OxyNEO in the United States resulted in reduced abuse of OxyContin, but abuse of other long-acting opioid medications and heroin increased [28-30].
[6] Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, The Use of OxyContin and OxyNeo in Adults: A Review of the Evidence on Safety, https://www.cadth.ca/sites/default/files/ pdf/htis/may-2013/RC0301-000 OxyNEO.pdf.
introduction of OxyNeo)," http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/ public/programs/drugs/ons/oxy faq.aspx.