asphyxia

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asphyxia

 [as-fik´se-ah]
pathological changes caused by lack of oxygen in respired air, resulting in a deficiency of oxygen in the blood (hypoxia) and an increase in carbon dioxide in the blood and tissues (hypercapnia). Symptoms include irregular and disturbed respirations, or a complete absence of breathing, and pallor or cyanosis. Asphyxia may occur whenever there is an interruption in the normal exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and the outside air. Some common causes are drowning, electric shock, hanging, suffocation, lodging of a foreign body in the air passages, inhalation of smoke and poisonous gases, and trauma to or disease of the lungs or air passages. Treatment includes immediate remedy of the situation by artificial respiration and removal of the underlying cause whenever possible. See also suffocation. adj., adj asphyx´�ial, asphyx´iant.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă),
Impaired or absent exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide on a ventilatory basis; combined hypercapnia and hypoxia or anoxia.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia

/as·phyx·ia/ (as-fik´se-ah) pathological changes caused by lack of oxygen in respired air, resulting in hypoxia and hypercapnia.asphyx´ial
fetal asphyxia  asphyxia in utero due to hypoxia.
asphyxia neonato´rum  respiratory failure in the newborn; see also respiratory distress syndrome of newborn, under syndrome.
traumatic asphyxia  that due to sudden or severe compression of the thorax or upper abdomen, or both.

asphyxia

(ăs-fĭk′sē-ə)
n.
A condition in which an extreme decrease in the concentration of oxygen in the body accompanied by an increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide leads to loss of consciousness or death. Asphyxia can be induced by choking, drowning, electric shock, injury, or the inhalation of toxic gases.

asphyxia

[asfik′sē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, a + sphyxis, without pulse
severe hypoxia leading to hypoxemia and hypercapnia, loss of consciousness, and, if not corrected, death. Some of the more common causes of asphyxia are drowning, electrical shock, aspiration of vomitus, lodging of a foreign body in the respiratory tract, inhalation of toxic gas or smoke, and poisoning. Oxygen and artificial ventilation are promptly administered to prevent damage to the brain. The underlying cause is then treated. See also artificial ventilation. asphyxiate, v., asphyxiated, adj.

asphyxia

Physiology
1. Impaired breathing.
2. A pathological state caused by the inadequate intake of O2, with accumulation of CO2 and hypoxia. See Autoerotic asphyxia, Sexual asphyxia.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă)
Impairment of ventilatory exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide; combined hypercapnia, hypoxia, or anoxia; causes death if not corrected.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia

Suffocation by interference with the free AIRWAY between the atmosphere and the air sacs in the lungs. Asphyxia is usually the cause of death in drowning, choking, strangling, inhalation of a gas which excludes oxygen, foreign body airway obstruction and OEDEMA of the LARYNX.

asphyxia

suffocation, lack of oxygen.

Asphyxia

Lack of oxygen. In the case of cerebral palsy, lack of oxygen to the brain.
Mentioned in: Cerebral Palsy

asphyxia

total deprivation of oxygen from any cause, leading to unconsciousness and death if unrelieved; originally from the Greek, meaning absence of a pulse, which rapidly follows total lack of oxygen. Includes obstruction to breathing (e.g. suffocation, strangulation) or depletion of oxygen in the inspired gas. See also apnoea, hypoxia.

asphyxia (as·fiksˑ·ē·),

n obstruction of air flow resulting in hypoxia severe enough to cause unconsciousness, hypercapnia, hypoxemia, and death, if not immediately treated.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă)
Impaired or absent exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide on a ventilatory basis; combined hypercapnia and hypoxia or anoxia.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia (asfik´sēə),

n a condition of suffocation resulting from restriction of oxygen intake and interference with the elimination of carbon dioxide.

asphyxia

a condition due to lack of oxygen in inspired air, resulting in actual or impending cessation of apparent life. It includes lack of air to respire. See also suffocation.

neonatal asphyxia
the fetus is deprived of air while on the birth canal and appears to have died during birth. Stimulation of respiratory movements and artificial respiration may cause respiration to resume.
References in periodicals archive ?
An abnormal MRI on Day 3, accompanied by certain labor and delivery problems, suggests that oxygen deprivation around the time of birth caused the brain injury.
The court ruled that both the incident of oxygen deprivation and the brain injury arising from it must occur within the same time period and that was not what occurred in this case.
It was the defendants' position that after the accident, but prior to and during the time of delivery, the infant suffered oxygen deprivation as a result of damage to the mother's placenta and that the pH level, sodium level and blood gases of the infant just prior to and at the time of delivery supported the existence of such a condition.
While the oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde doubled in untreated rats that underwent oxygen deprivation compared with control rats, tea polyphenol administration reduced malondialdehyde by 40%.
A brain scan has since revealed Holly's brain injury and cerebral palsy were all a direct consequence of oxygen deprivation at the time of her birth.
Predicting decompensations [when a heart valve is too weakened by oxygen deprivation to pump enough blood to body tissues] in time can enable appropriate change in medication, avoiding expensive hospitalizations and increasing both the life expectancy and quality of life of the patient," the company states.
Pilot Donovan Nash must resist decompression and oxygen deprivation to reach the cockpit, and land a plane he's never flown with no power and no instruments.
There's a reason this is happening: Because companies' brains have been suffering from a kind of oxygen deprivation, and you in materials handling represent a vast untapped reservoir of fresh air.
Researchers plan to use the system to study oxygen deprivation in mountain climbers, with the hope of improving treatment for critically ill patients.
He almost died after winning the Jockey Club Cup five years ago through oxygen deprivation and he was never the same after that, but he never gets out of second gear these days, he just cruises round.
Even minimal oxygen deprivation can cause anoxic ischemic encephalopathy (AIE), Dr.
Sharp, 34, of Guisborough, Teesside, died in a snow cave 1,000 feet from the mountain's peak, apparently from oxygen deprivation suffered during his solo descent.