Oxford ragwort

Oxford ragwort

seneciosqualidus.
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There is another small wasteground plant that did naturally spread along railways called Oxford ragwort but it originated on Mount Etna, in Sicily.
Ingenious Ireland also picks up on the travel narratives of disease and botany whether it is the Black Death arriving in Howth in 1348 or the history of the arrival of the Oxford Ragwort with its slightly sniffy Latin name Senecio squalidus in Inchicore in 1890.
The plant is the product of a natural cross between the common groundsel, a British plant, and the Oxford ragwort, introduced from Sicily 300 years ago.
As in the essay on Wycliffe, however, Aston is less than comprehensive when it comes to considering vernacular literary evidence for religious culture, mainly citing Pecock's voluminous writings from secondary sources and overlooking, for example, evidence linking Pecock with a London common-profit library, yet finding space to include an entirely dispensable footnote on the history of the Oxford ragwort.

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