Oxalobacter formigenes


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Oxalobacter formigenes

A facultative anaerobic bacteria of the normal colonic flora of 80% of adults, who are usually colonised by age 3, which digests oxalates. Oxalobacter is missing or depleted in many patients with hyperoxaluria, and up to 90% of those with multiple episodes of calcium oxalate stone formation. Oxalobacter loss is linked to prolonged or repeated antibiotic therapy (with fluoroquinolones, cephalosporins, tetracyclines, and macrolides, but not penicillin and sulfa drugs) as seen in women with recurrent UTIs and patients with cystic fibrosis.

Diagnosis
PCR to detect Oxalobacter.
 
Management
Oxalate-digesting enzymes from Oxalobacter reduce intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary oxalate excretion; recolonization of GI tract with Oxalobacter has proven ineffective.

Oxalobacter formigenes

(ok″să-lō-bak′tĕr for-mij′ĕ-nēz)
A gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium that inhabits the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and metabolizes oxalates. The absence of this species from the GI tract or its elimination by antibiotic therapy may increase the likelihood of the patient's developing calcium oxalate stones in the urine.

Oxalobacter formigenes

a resident ruminal digestive adjunctal bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new European patents EP2449098 cover pharmaceutical compositions of oxalate decarboxylase, EP1771201 and EP1965816 covering pharmaceutical compositions of Oxalobacter formigenes.
Purification and characterization of formyl-coenzyme A transferase from Oxalobacter formigenes.
Oxalobacter formigenes sadece barsaklardaki okzalati indirgemekle kalmaz.
The current belief is that microorganisms such as Oxalobacter formigenes are important for metabolising oxalate.
In the preliminary study, a single dose of the bacterium Oxalobacter formigenes, taken by volunteers lacking the microorganism, resulted in an overall reduction of oxalate levels in urine.
Now, the two researchers are concentrating on an oxalate-degrading bacterium called Oxalobacter formigenes that lives in the digestive tracts of cattle, sheep, and humans.