ovomucin


Also found in: Wikipedia.

o·vo·mu·cin

(ō'vō-myū'sin),
A glycoprotein in the white of egg.

ovomucin

An older, nonspecific term for glycoprotein(s) that precipitates when the egg white is diluted with water.

ovomucin

(ō″vō-mū′sĭn)
A glycoprotein in the white of an egg.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Sequential separation of lysozyme, ovomucin, ovotransferrin, and ovalbumin from egg white.
There are some nutrients in egg, such as ovomucin [146], sulfur-containing proteins [147-149], hydrolyzed proteins [106], and phospholipids [43], which may be considered bioactive and have their own functions.
Later, ovomucin was removed and the resulting suspension was precipitated with ammonium sulfate 5% (w/v) and 2.5% (w/v) citric acid and then centrifuged at 3400 xg for 40 minutes at 4[degrees]C.
Internal egg quality depends, in part, on the presence and stability of the dense layer of albumen, which is given by the protein ovomucin. This quality can be influenced by several factors such as those related to hens (age and genetics), nutrition (raw materials, microingredients) and the environment (temperature, egg storage and management) (LEANDRO et al., 2005).
Albumin, transferrin, ovomucin, lysozyme, or combinations of these proteins in powdered form may be mixed with a mild acid and dissolved in water.
The albumin proteins in the egg white (primarily conalbumin and ovomucin) become denatured when agitated and unravel, securing pockets of air and water that allow the creation of a stable egg foam.
In addition, pronase-prepared glycopeptides of ovomucin have demonstrated anti-tumor effects in a double-grafted tumor system in mice.
Changes in pH imply modifications in albumen proteins, so that it becomes thinner and looses C[O.sub.2], allowing rupture of the electrostatic complex between lysozyme and ovomucin (Scott and Silversides, 2000; Silversides and Scott, 2001).
Albumin, livetin, ovalbumin, ovomucin, ovomucoid and ovovitellin would be labeled as "egg."
The viscosity of the thick white is attributed to the presence of the ovomucin [28], and the HU value is mainly influenced by the egg ovomucin content.
The viscosity of the thick white gives the egg white its viscous character and is conferred by a glycoprotein ovomucin (Brooks and Hale, 1959; Omana et al., 2010), and the HU value was mainly influenced by ovomucin content of egg.
Egg albumen is mostly composed of simple proteins and protein complexes such as ovalbumin, ovoglobulin, ovoconalbumin and glycoproteins including ovomucin and ovomucoid (Romanoff and Romanoff, 1963) and the presence of anti-bacterial lysozyme as likely to be a factor limiting the growth of bacteria L.