overtone

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o·ver·tone

(ō'vĕr-tōn),
Any of the tones, other than the lowest or fundamental tone, of which a complex sound is composed.

overtone

1 any tone produced by voice or a musical instrument that is of a higher frequency than the lowest or fundamental tone of a sound.
2 a harmonic.

overtone

In music and acoustics, a harmonic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since then The Overtones have established a reputation as a group with the unique ability to deliver consistently uplifting music infused with exquisitely crafted vocal harmonies.
The reconstituted Rustic Overtones will be playing Tammany Hall, 43 Pleasant St.
Playing the tritare generates harmonic overtones, but it also creates sounds that are nonharmonic.
The tritare generates not only those harmonic overtones but also nonharmonic ones, he says.
As soon as the non-scientific neologism "pre-embryo" was introduced, the word 'embryo' with its moral and emotional overtones began to fade from the scene.
Economics, because it bridges the humanities and science, and has huge political overtones.
Recently an anecdote told by Larry Minnix, president and CEO of the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging (AAHSA), about his family during the Depression sparked a warm family memory of my own, with overtones of meaning, as it turns out, for the nursing home field.
The most memorable scene in the TV movie based on Byron's book comes when Stewart, played by Cybill Shepherd with Mommie Dearest overtones, screams to a woman she thinks is sleeping with her eventual ex-husband, "Hey slut, I'm sending your parents a letter and telling them you're a whore
Oolong is prized for its distinguishing fruity overtones, often resembling peaches, apples, honey, or chestnuts.
The first C-H stretching overtones of trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene, and trans-dichloroethylene were probed for the gas- and adsorbed-phase species using a seeded optical parametric amplifier.
When the hammer strikes the string as a result of key depression, the string begins to vibrate, first along its full length--producing a sound called the fundamental--and then it vibrates in sections, first in halves, then in thirds, then quarters and so on, creating sounds called overtones or upper partials, which are higher in pitch than the fundamental.
1) The soon-to-be-published Lexicon of the Family and Life will strip the political overtones from terms like "gender" and "reproductive rights," which some Catholic leaders view as "code" for issues that they consider morally questionable--namely, feminist and gay issues and abortion.