overfishing

(redirected from Over-fishing)
Also found in: Dictionary.

overfishing

the removal of fish from a population beyond the point where the population is able to maintain its numbers and goes into decline.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Over-fishing is one of three major challenges facing the oceans, along with pollution and global warming which leads to rising acid levels.
Study suggests that climate change, over-fishing and mismanagement have reduced ocean's fish stocks by half since 1970
Later this month, governments are due to adopt new UN sustainable development goals, including ending over-fishing and destructive fishing practices by 2020 and restoring stocks "in the shortest time feasible".
Speaking on Sunday in Nouakchott, the Mauritanian capital, Diame said the West African waters were badly affected by over-fishing.
Over-fishing is major concern for the EU as, for example, Atlanto-Scandian herring numbers have plummeted over recent years.
Mr Fearnley-Whittingstall, who has won wide UK support for his battle against "discards", said in a statement: "It's fantastic news that MEPs voted for a strong discards ban and a legally-binding end to over-fishing.
MACKEREL has fallen victim to over-fishing - just like the tuna, the shark, and the compliment - and has controversially been downgraded from a "fish to eat" to one to eat "very occasionally".
OCEAN2012 which is a group involved in the exhibition says over-fishing might be the world's biggest environmental problem.
I have received well over a thousand letters expressing concern about the destruction of UK stocks as a result of over-fishing by EU vessels.
Jamie Oliver said: "Fish is delicious and good for you but, as most of us know, we need to be careful about over-fishing.
Malcolm Harbour, Tory MEP for the West Midlands, said the new laws will see a limit set on how much fish can be caught in certain areas of Europe in a bid to halt over-fishing and will come in to effect by 2015.
The number of jellyfish inhabiting waters is on the rise, according to the Marine Conservation Society (MCS), with pollution, over-fishing and climate change among the theories being used to explain the increase.