outlier

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outlier

 [out´li-er]
an observation so distant from the central mass of the data that it noticeably influences results and must be carefully checked to ensure it is not an error.

out·li·er

(owt'lē-ĕr),
An observation that differs so widely from all others in a set as to justify the conclusion that a gross error has occurred or that it comes from a different population.

outlier

/out·li·er/ (out´li-er) an observation so distant from the central mass of the data that it noticeably influences results.

outlier

1 (in managed care) a case in which costs exceed the allowable amount for the specific diagnosis or treatment. The outlier amount is typically specified in advance in the contract between the provider and payer.
2 (in research) an observation that differs from all others, suggesting that a gross error has occurred in sampling, measurement, or analysis.

outlier

Any value outside of an expected range.

outlier

Managed care A Pt who falls outside of the norm–ie, who has an extremely long length of hospital stay or has incurred extraordinarily high costs. See Extreme outlier, High mortality outlier.

out·li·er

(owt'lī-ĕr)
1. Deviant values or figures that are obviously from a different population than those from the rest of the sample.
2. Additions to an estimated cost of delivered services when exceeding a fixed loss threshold.

outlier

an extremely high or low value lying beyond the range of the bulk of the data.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the main effect of percent of outlying observations was also statistically significantly related to estimation bias for [[beta].
1] by method and percent of outlying observations appear in the bottom panel of Table 5.
133), as was the main effect of percent of outlying observations ([F.
00] by percent of outlying observations and estimation method, averaged across the other variables.
The equation explains about 70 per cent of labour demand over this period, with only a few outlying observations on the downside during the recessions of 1973-5 and 1981-2.