air pollution

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Related to Outdoor Air Pollution: Indoor Air Pollution

air pol·lu·tion

contamination of air by smoke and harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, as from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, or burning rubbish.
See also: smog.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

air pollution

The presence in the air of substances suh as carbon monoxide (CO), NO2, ozone, particulate matter, and SO2, which are byproducts of human activities, and which have an adverse effect on health. Fine (diameter ≤2.5 µm) particles are derived primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels in transportation, manufacturing, and power generation, and are mixed with soot, acid condensates, nitrate and sulfate particles, and may pose a greater risk to health as they are generally more toxic and can be inhaled deeply into the lungs; there is a significant association between fine particulate air pollution and deaths from cardiopulmonary disease, lung cancer, and other causes.
Health effects of air pollution Respiratory complaints, restricted activity, chest discomfort, sore throats, eye irritation; CO and ozone are linked to heart malformations and heart valve defects.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

air pol·lu·tion

(ār pŏ-lū'shŭn)
Contamination of air by smoke, particulate matter, and harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, as from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, and burning rubbish.
See also: smog
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

air pollution

the presence of contaminants in the form of dust, fumes, gases or other chemicals in the atmosphere in quantities which adversely affect living organisms. See ACID RAIN.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Patient discussion about air pollution

Q. where would i find list of all the "clean" cities and the rates of air pollution ...?

A. i don't know about a list of "good" cities, but i know a list of the worse cities for Asthmatic people!-
http://www.webmd.com/asthma/news/20050215/americas-worst-asthma-cities

More discussions about air pollution
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References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Government regulation and emission reduction technology for vehicles and factories have decreased emissions from certain point sources of outdoor air pollution. VOCs that escape from indoor uses of chemical products now make up a greater share of outdoor organic air pollution in urban areas.
Almost one in seven children live in areas with high levels of outdoor air pollution, mostly in South Asia, UN children's agency Unicef said.
A new OECD report, The Economic Consequences of Outdoor Air Pollution, estimates that outdoor air pollution will cause 6-9 million premature deaths annually by 2060, compared to 3 million in 2010.
The components of outdoor air pollution include the smog, particulates, acid rain and Greenhouse Gases (GHG).
In most cities that monitor air quality, outdoor air pollution fails to meet safety guidelines set forth by the World Health Organization (WHO)--including about half of the urban population exposed to air pollution that is at least 2.5 times higher than the WHO-recommended levels.
While outdoor air pollution is partly caused by incipient industrialization, this represents a temporary tradeoff for the poor -- escaping hunger, infectious disease, and indoor air pollution to be better able to afford food, health care, and education.
WHO called for enhanced awareness of health risks from air pollution, noting that outdoor air pollution from coal heating fires and diesel engines resulted in deaths of 3.7 million people under 60 in 2012, mostly in Southeast Asia and Western Pacific.
In April 2014, WHO issued new information estimating that outdoor air pollution was responsible for the deaths of some 3.7 million people under the age of 60 in 2012.
In particular, the new data reveal a stronger link between both indoor and outdoor air pollution exposure and cardiovascular diseases, such as strokes and ischaemic heart disease, as well as between air pollution and cancer.
"The estimations we have now tell us there are 3.5 million premature deaths every year caused by household air pollution, and 3.3 million death every year caused by outdoor air pollution," Dr.
"While outdoor air pollution can increase the risk of lung cancer, it is estimated that fewer than 5% of lung cancers are due to air pollution.

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