illegitimacy

(redirected from Out-of-wedlock birth)
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illegitimacy

Nonmarital, out of wedlock Social medicine The legal status of a child born to unwed parents
References in periodicals archive ?
The margin of error is increased by the fact that an out-of-wedlock birth was not always noted when the parents married shortly before a christening.
The proposal would repeal an annual $100 million out-of-wedlock birth bonus (awarded each year to the five states with the greatest percentage reduction in out-of-wedlock births--without an increase in abortion rates).
In contrast to the popular view that the African Americans condone out-of-wedlock birth, Kaplan (1997) asserts that Black families strongly discourage this behavior.
OUT-OF-WEDLOCK BIRTHS RISE AS MARRIAGE RATES DROP (PER 1,000 WOMEN) Births to Marriages unmarried mothers 1960 73.
Working to promote healthy marriages and to reduce out-of-wedlock births, FTF has collaborated with numerous social service agencies, churches, businesses, schools, and media outlets.
When the "Moynihan Report" was leaked to the press in 1965, out-of-wedlock birth rates and the growth in black female-headed households became apolitically explosive issue, imbued as it is with issues of religion, race, gender roles, and sexuality.
Who can say what the out-of-wedlock birth rate for blacks would be if there had been no slavery?
An out-of-wedlock birth effectively precludes such contact between herself and her biological and social father.
Using discourse analysis as developed in Foucault's Archaeology of Knowledge, she examines how it came to be possible to talk about illegitimacy as a social problem; how the problem has transmuted into different and often widely divergent shapes within different intellectual and professional contexts; and the effects of this discursive and historical legacy on today's debates, or what some rightly argue is today's obsession with out-of-wedlock birth rates, teenage pregnancy, and single parenthood more generally (p.
One contributing factor to the number of African-American children in such households is the high out-of-wedlock birth ratio (approximately 60 percent) among black women.
In a second study, Kaestner finds that drug use is a significant predictor of being an unwed mother and of having an out-of-wedlock birth.
Many studies have exploited differences in benefits across time or states, using discrete choice models to test whether welfare benefits affect the probability that an unmarried woman has an out-of-wedlock birth or to test the aggregate relation between benefit levels and the state's illegitimacy rate.