substantia

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substantia

 [sub-stan´she-ah] (L.)
substance; used in anatomic nomenclature in naming various components of body tissues or structures.
substantia al´ba white matter.
substantia gelatino´sa the substance sheathing the posterior horn of the spinal cord and lining its central canal.
substantia gri´sea gray matter.
substantia ni´gra a dark layer of gray matter separating the tegmentum of the midbrain from the crus cerebri.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stănts),
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA], matter
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub- sto, to stand under, be present]

substantia

/sub·stan·tia/ (sub-stan´shah) pl. substan´tiae   [L.] substance.
substantia al´ba  the white nervous tissue, constituting the conducting portion of the brain and spinal cord, composed mostly of myelinated nerve fibers.
substantia ferrugi´nea  locus caeruleus.
substantia gelatino´sa  the gelatinous-appearing cap forming the dorsal part of the posterior horn of the spinal cord.
substantia gri´sea  gray substance; the gray nervous tissue composed of nerve cell bodies, unmyelinated nerve fibers, and supportive tissue.
substantia ni´gra  the layer of gray substance separating the tegmentum of the midbrain from the crus cerebri.
substantia pro´pria 
1. the tough, fibrous, transparent main part of the cornea, between Bowman's membrane and Descemet's membrane.
2. the main part of the sclera, between the episcleral lamina and the lamina fusca.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stăns)
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA] , matter.
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub-sto, to stand under, be present]

substantia

pl. substantiae [L.] substance.

substantia alba
the white matter of the spinal cord and the brain.
substantia compacta
compact bone.
substantia gelatinosa
the substance sheathing the posterior horn of the spinal cord and lining its central canal.
substantia grisea
the gray matter of the spinal cord and brain.
substantia grisea centralis
the central gray matter that surrounds the cerebral aqueduct.
substantia nigra
the layer of gray substance separating the tegmentum of the midbrain from the crus cerebri.
substantia propria corneae
layer of transparent lamellated fibrous connective tissue which constitutes the bulk of the cornea; composed of collagen fibers disposed in platelike formations, fibroblasts and ground substance with many nerve fibers but no blood vessels.
substantia propria choroid
loose connective tissue of the choroid.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the fourth and fifth century controversies concerning the person of Christ, for example, the church confessed its faith in non-biblical, philosophical language such as hypostasis and ousia and even homoousios--words never used in the numerous biblical confessions concerning Jesus.
The megista gene are not differentiated by their perceptive capacities but Aristotle does accept these features are in the logos of the ousia of animals (PA II.
Each person, indeed, is a unique hypostasis, but he fails to consider fully that each hypostasis is a particular enhypostatization of an ousia or nature--in this case humanity--that also has significant bearing on questions of human rights and political theology more broadly.
When Aristotle uses 'separate' in this technical way, he is connecting it with the concept of priority in ousia ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
Maybe not noticed at first sight, this interpretation in fact reveals, besides Neoplatonic hierarchism, the difficulty of adapting the Greek epistemic ideal of truth as a kind of static immutable ousia conveyed by logos--to the dynamic concealment of the Christian God.
In the West, there is the particular impression that the Godhead is distinct from the three persons and is an independent but apophatic ousia of oneness.
Immanently, in God (for whom the distinction between essence and existence does not obtain), this difference is expressed in the relations among the persons vis-a-vis the divine ousia.
You swing your mind back from the three manifestations of God that we can sense, to the ousia of God, the one that we can never know, backward and forward.
They were, in fact, not only masters of eidetic description--who attempted to describe as faithfully as possible the essence or ousia of that which appears to consciousness--but were also quite adept at practicing a lived form of the phenomenological reduction, the philosophical life being for them a life lived in a lucid and joyful awareness of what Epictetus (Discourses II, 14) called the wondrous "fair" that is the world (this is what, speaking of the reduction, Husserl's late assistant, Eugen Fink, called "an immeasurable astonishment over the mysteriousness of .
When Aristotle forced verbs to act as nouns (turning 'slew' into 'the slayer of'), he did so on behalf of ousia and the simplification of the copula, which he understood in spatial terms as if he were using contemporary eyes: namely as connecting species to genus.
27) In de Anima II 4 Aristotle says that generative soul is essentially the capacity to reproduce the form and ousia of the individual in a different material body (415a268), while nutritive soul is the capacity to maintain that form and ousia in the same body (416b3-24).
For a proper understanding of "basic," the function "essential" has to be reaffirmed to its noun "essence," in turn to the Latin root esse (sum) and the Greek antecedent ousia, all signifying the verb "being.