otolith

(redirected from Otolith organ)
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Related to Otolith organ: utriculus, Saccule and utricle

statolith

 [stat´o-lith]
1. a granule of the statoconia.
2. a solid or semisolid body occurring in the labyrinth of animals.

otolith

(ō′tə-lĭth′)
n.
One of the small calcareous particles found in the inner ear of many vertebrates, especially fishes, which are involved in determining body orientation and sometimes in perceiving sound.

o′to·lith′ic adj.

otolith

(1) An auditory ossicle. 
(2) A larger calcified concrement within the ear.
(3) A minute calcium carbonate granule located near the sensory hair cell in the inner ear; statolith.

otolith

One of the many tiny calcareous particles found in the utricle and sacculus of the inner ear. These move under gravitational and accelerative forces causing stimulation of hair cells and the production of nerve impulses that provide the brain with information about the position and movement of the head.

otolith

or

otoconium

a granule of calcareous material, several of which occur in the inner ear of vertebrates, where they are attached to processes associated with sensitive cells, and register gravity By means of such sense organs, vertebrates are able to assess their position with respect to gravity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in collective otoconial mass between the paired otolith organs could in principle result in asymmetric shear forces on the otolith membranes, although a compensation for asymmetries in vestibular function typically occurs [29].
[17] When the head is moved to an off-vertical or lateral position, the otolith organs change their neural firing rate and the disinhibition of this end-organ signal causes nystagmus and vertigo.
How will those pesky otolith organs of yours react this time?
When adding power and accelerating during a go-around, especially in more powerful aircraft, the otolith organs in the inner ear send signals to the brain that create the somatogravic illusion of pitching up abruptly.
The Epley maneuver jars the wayward otoconia from the semicircular canal and gets them to fall back into the otolith organs. The patient is seated on the examining table, with the head turned 45 degrees as in the Dix-Hallpike test, for 1-4 minutes.