otolaryngology

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Related to Otolaryngologists: ear specialist, otorhinolaryngology

o·to·lar·yn·gol·o·gy

(ō'tō-lar'ing-gol'ŏ-jē),
The combined specialties of diseases of the ear, pharynx, and larynx, including the upper respiratory tract and diseases of the head and neck, tracheobronchial tree, and esophagus.
[oto- + G. larynx, + logos, study]

otolaryngology

/oto·lar·yn·gol·o·gy/ (o″to-lar″ing-gol´ah-je) the branch of medicine dealing with disease of the ear, nose, and throat.

otolaryngology

(ō′tō-lăr′ĭng-gŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the ear, nose, and throat. Also called otorhinolaryngology.

o′to·lar·yn′go·log′i·cal (-lə-rĭng′gə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
o′to·lar′yn·gol′o·gist n.

otolaryngology

[-ler′ing·gol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, ous + larynx + logos, science
a branch of medicine dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the ears, nose, throat, and adjacent structures of the head and neck.

o·to·lar·yn·gol·o·gy

(ō'tō-lar-in-gol'ŏ-jē)
The combined specialties of diseases of the ear and larynx, often including upper respiratory tract and many diseases of the head and neck, tracheobronchial tree, and esophagus.
[oto- + G. larynx, + logos, study]

otolaryngology,

n the branch or specialty of medicine that deals with diseases of the ear, nose, and throat.

otolaryngology, otorhinolaryngology

that branch of veterinary medicine dealing with disease of the ear, nose and throat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Satiani et al have estimated that the shortage of otolaryngologists in the United States was 838 in 2010.
Of the patients referred to specialists, only about half had their diagnoses confirmed: 330 of the 662 patients sent to otolaryngologists, and 150 of the 309 patients sent to allergists.
Otolaryngologists should follow this matter closely and be alert to help patients who have been treated suboptimally through the HHI process.
Academic medicine is attractive to many young otolaryngologists, not only for intellectual reasons, but also because the burdens of running a private-practice business have increased in recent years, and the financial disparity between private practice and academic practice has narrowed.
If we are going to collaborate with the legal system by serving as expert witnesses, otolaryngologists should recognize that there are standards to guide our behavior.
This may work in larger cities or academic institutions where there are enough otolaryngologists to share the load, but in smaller communities it is not likely that these types of arrangements will be made.
2) The 2004 AAO-HNS workforce survey showed that 65% of all practicing otolaryngologists who responded were practicing general otolaryngology.
These 4,837 members represent 44% of the approximately 11,000 otolaryngologists in the United States who could be members.
Over the course of a career, many otolaryngologists serve in leadership positions, such as chair of a department of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery in a hospital or clinical service chief.
The practice consists of nine physicians--eight otolaryngologists and one neurologist--and specializes in a wide range of treatments for conditions related to the ear, nose and throat.