Otodectes

Otodectes

(ō'tō-dek'tēz),
A genus of ear mites (family Psoroptidae) consisting of a single species, Otodectes cynotis, the cause of otodectic mange in dogs, cats, and other carnivores; the entire lifespan of this mite is spent in the ears (rarely on the body) of the host, where it feeds on epidermal debris; it can be found in the encrusted material scraped from infected ears.
[oto- + dektēs, beggar, receiver]

Otodectes

/Oto·dec·tes/ (o″to-dek´tēz) a genus of mites.

Otodectes

acarid mite genus in the family Psoroptidae.

Otodectes cynotis
the ear mite of dogs, foxes, cats, raccoons and ferrets and causes otodectic mange.
Enlarge picture
Otodectes cynotis. By permission from Gotthelf LN, Small Animal Ear Disease, Saunders, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Formally known as Otodectes cynotis, ear mites are small, barely visible mites that think your cat's ears are the perfect place to live.
Otodectes cynotis mites are non burrowing, white and active parasite reported worldwide in external auditory canal of cats, dogs, ferrets and other carnivores (Wilson and Zarnke, 1985; Wall and Sheearer, 2001).
cosecha alfreddugesi Otodectes cynotis Acaro de la sarna C aninos, felinos de la oreja Nombre cientifico Localizacion y sintomatologia Chorioptes bovis En los espolones y la Chorioptes sp base de la cola.
The types of mites that cause problems in dogs are Demodex, Sarcoptic (scabies), Cheyletiella and Otodectes (ear mites).
Ear mite infection is usually caused by the parasite Otodectes cynotis which are microscopic and therefore invisible to the naked eye.
zeylanicum oil could represent a possible alternative for the topical treatment of psoroptic mange in rabbits and encourage further studies to evaluate its efficacy also on other mange mites responsible for otoacariasis, such as Otodectes cynotis, or skin diseases, such as Sarcoptes scabiei, in other animal species and in humans (Arlian, 1996; Wrenn, 1996).
5%) presented ear canal inflammation due to Otodectes cynotis, 4 (7.
In the letter, Lopez, a veterinarian in Westport, New York, described the results of a number of experiments he had conducted to determine whether Otodectes cynotis, an ear mite usually found in cats and dogs, could also infest human beings.
It is also possible to suspect the presence of Otodectes cynotis by the mess that they tend to make inside an infested animal's ear canal--a dark, crumbly accumulation of reddish-brown wax and mite debris that they continually generate and in which they characteristically wallow.