otoconia


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to otoconia: Epley maneuver

statoconia

 [stat″o-ko´ne-ah] (pl. of statoco´nium)
minute calcareous particles in the gelatinous membrane surmounting the macula in the inner ear; called also otoconia, otoliths, and statoliths.

o·to·liths

, otolites (ō'tō-līths, ō'tō-līt-is), [TA]
Crystalline particles of calcium carbonate and a protein adhering to the gelatinous membrane of the maculae of the utricle and saccule.
[oto- + G. lithos, stone]

stat·o·liths

(stat'ŏ-liths)
Crystalline particles of calcium carbonate and a protein adhering to the gelatinous membrane of the maculae of the utricle and saccule.
Synonym(s): statoconia [TA] , otoconia.
[G. statos, standing, + lithos, stone]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ocular VEMPs indicate repositioning of otoconia to the utricle after successful liberatory maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo.
This result suggested that there was no change in the saccule function because there was no return of otoconia, the presence of which would increase the absolute value of the amplitude.
Such studies have suggested that osteoporosis and accordingly the Ca metabolism may be a risk factor for developing BPPV by affecting particularly the peripheral zone in otoconia, which have a similar structure with bone tissue (3).
BPV can result from canalolithiasis where the otoconia are freely floating in the duct of the semicircular canal or cupulolithiasis where the otoconia are adherent to the cupula.
Andrew Clements said: "It's caused when debris from otoconia crystals (part of the mechanism by which we balance and sense gravity) fall into the wrong part of the ear."
Andrew Clements explains: "It's caused when debris from otoconia crystals (part of the mechanism by which we balance and sense gravity) fall into the wrong part of the ear."
It occurs when otoconia that are normally embedded in gel in the utricle become dislodged and migrate into the 3 fluid-filled semicircular canals, where they interfere with the normal fluid movement these canals use to sense head motion, causing the inner ear to send false signals to the brain.
BPPV is often accompained with nausea, vomiting, (27) and is usually caused by dislodged otoconia in the posterior semicircular canal.
In vertebrates, this organ is called an otocyst with an otolith or otoconia (Budelmann, 1988).
Crystals--micropar-tides of calcium, called otoconia, that form in the balance canals of the inner ear--cause a condition called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
Displacement of otoconia from utricle to semicircular canals is held responsible for the development of BPPV.
The term BPPV relates to otoconia (microscopic calcium carbonate crystals) that are normally present in the utricle of the inner ear being displaced into the semi-circular canals (Barany 1921).