osteophyte

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osteophyte

 [os´te-o-fīt]
a bony excrescence or outgrowth.

os·te·o·phyte

(os'tē-ō-fīt),
A bony outgrowth or protuberance.
[osteo- + G. phyton, plant]

osteophyte

/os·teo·phyte/ (os´te-o-fīt″) a bony excrescence or outgrowth of bone.

osteophyte

(ŏs′tē-ə-fīt′)
n.
A small, abnormal bony outgrowth.

os′te·o·phyt′ic (-fĭt′ĭk) adj.

osteophyte

[os′tē·əfīt]
a bony outgrowth, usually found around a joint. It is commonly seen in degenerative joint disease.

osteophyte

Orthopedics A bony bump

os·te·o·phyte

(os'tē-ō-fīt)
A bony outgrowth or protuberance.
Synonym(s): osteophyma.
[osteo- + G. phyton, plant]

osteophyte

A bony outgrowth occurring usually adjacent to an area of articular cartilage damage in a joint affected by OSTEOARTHRITIS. Osteophytes are also common around the intervertebral discs of the spine.

Osteophyte

Also referred to as bone spur, it is an outgrowth or ridge that forms on a bone.
Mentioned in: Cervical Spondylosis

osteophyte, osteophyma

a bony excrescence; a bony outgrowth. See also exostosis, spondylosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
This result can be due to other parameters added to JSW, which are osteophyte formation, subchondral sclerosis and cysts.
Postsurgical recurrence of osteophytes causing dysphagia in patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.
Imaging does not document two of the following: subchondral cysts, subchondral sclerosis, periarticular osteophytes, and joint subluxation.
Radiographs of the hamulus and pterygomaxillary region should be obtained to determine whether the hamulus is fractured, whether an osteophyte is present on the hamular process producing inflammation of the bursa, or for any other abnormal findings.
All patients underwent anterior capsulectomy and additional procedures included: Z-lengthening of lateral collateral ligament n = 8; excision of radial head n = 3; removal of metalwork n = 3; excision of olecranon osteophyte n = 2; and ulna nerve transposition (via a separate medial incision) n = 2.
Pathophysiological factors in CSM Mechanical Static Congenital canal stenosis Cervical disc prolapse Vertebral osteophyte formation Hypertrophic ossification of PLL Ligamentum flavum hypertrophy Facet/unconvertable hypertrophy Dynamic Repetitive movements Primarily in sagittal plane Poor cord elasticity Ischaemic Compression of larger arteries Decreased pia/medullary flow Venous congestion PLL - posterior longitudinal ligament.
1), (2) Physiological compression occurs during elbow flexion, but compression may also be the result of masses in the tunnel, including ganglions and bursae or synovitis or osteophytes.
Radiographs confirmed osteophytes and predominantly medial tibiofemoral OA.
There was no erosion of the head of the condyle characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and no osteophytes were visible.
With this condition there is a narrowing of the space between the vertebrae and benign bony growths, called osteophytes, that develop on Over-the-counter painkillers and anti-inflammatory medicines ease pain and discomfort and some sufferers may be offered physio.
These may be osteophytes arising from cervical spondylosis, or they may be due to primary musculo-skeletal disorders, such as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).