osteometry

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Related to Osteometric: osteogen, spondylodynia

osteometry

 [os″te-om´ĕ-tre]
measurement of the bones.

os·te·om·e·try

(os'tē-om'ĕ-trē),
The branch of anthropometry concerned with the relative size of the different parts of the skeleton.
[osteo- + G. metron, measurement]

osteometry

/os·te·om·e·try/ (os″te-om´ĭ-tre) measurement of the bones.

osteometry

measurement of the bones.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Table and portable osteometric boards--expensive pieces of equipment that allow precise skeletal measurements--can be purchased from specialized suppliers.
Osteometric analyses therefore present one additional means by which biological responses to changing ice conditions might be observed through archaeological data.
Although extremely low, this level of genetic variation is very close to the broad-sense heritability estimates of 0% to 11% (average about 3%) calculated by Leamy (1984) for DA in 10 osteometric characters in inbred and hybrid house mice.
The distal forelimbs and mandibles of 157 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) harvested during the 2001 fall hunting season on the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, were used to explore the osteometric correlation of sex, age, and body mass with hoof size.
Lumbar vertebrae for osteometric study were kept on the table and different measurements were taken directly on the bones.
Osteometric data from the human remains recovered at the Mangum Site in Claiborne County, MS, a Plaquemine necropolis dating to approximately 1300 AD, were analyzed for patterns of stature and robusticity.
Morphologic and osteometric assessment of age, sex, and race from the skull.
The total length of the bone was measured using osteometric board.
The distal forelimbs and mandibles of 157 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) harvested during 2001 on Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, were used to determine the osteometric correlation of sex, age, and body mass with hoof size.
1981, 1982, 1985; Leamy, 1974, 1977, 1982a, 1982h; Leamy and Atchley, 1984) has yielded detailed information about the heritable and environmental determinants of osteometric variation within domesticated populations, but the larger relevance of these studies for understanding patterns of skeletal divergence among natural populations and species is obscure.