Osgood-Schlatter disease

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Osgood-Schlatter disease

 [oz´good shlaht´er]
osteochondrosis of the tuberosity of the tibia; called also Schlatter-Osgood disease.

Os·good-Schlat·ter dis·ease

(oz'gud shlaht'ĕr),
inflammation of the growth center (apophysis) that forms the tibial tubercle.

Osgood-Schlatter disease

[-shlat′ər]
Etymology: Robert B. Osgood, American surgeon, 1873-1956; Carl Schlatter, Swiss surgeon, 1864-1934
inflammation or partial separation of the tibial tubercle caused by chronic irritation, usually as a result of overuse of the quadriceps muscle. The condition is seen primarily in muscular, athletic adolescent boys and is characterized by swelling and tenderness over the tibial tubercle that increase with exercise or any activity that extends the leg. Treatment consists primarily of preventing further irritation during the healing process, which may necessitate complete immobilization of the knee in a cast. Any residual nonunion of a proximal fragment after healing may require surgical excision. Also called Osgood's disease, Schlatter-Osgood disease, Schlatter's disease.

Osgood-Schlatter disease

Apophysitis of tibial tubercle, Osteochondrosis Orthopedics A condition seen in ♂ age 10 to 15, characterized by unilateral or bilateral post-exercise pain with a painful bump, at the anterior tibial tubercle Etiology Unknown, possibly microtrauma before complete maturity of the tibial tubercle Clinical Running, jumping, climbing stairs, traction cause discomfort, especially in active, athletic adolescents. See Osteochondrosis.

Os·good-Schlat·ter dis·ease

(oz'gud shlah'ter di-zēz')
Inflammation or partial avulsion of the tibial apophysis due to traction forces.
Synonym(s): Schlatter disease, Schlatter-Osgood disease.

Osgood-Schlatter disease

A knee disorder most common in early adolescent boys. It is caused by repetitive tension on the upper part of the front of the main lower leg bone (tibia) by the strong tendon of the front thigh muscles (quadriceps). This occurs as the knee is straightened against resistance as in climbing and cycling, and softening occurs in the protrusion on the bone into which the tendon is inserted, causing pain, muscle spasm and disability. The condition is treated by rest or, in severe cases, by immobilizing the knee in a plaster. (Robert Bayley Osgood, 1873–1956, American surgeon; and Carl Schlatter, 1864–1934, Swiss surgeon).

Osgood,

Robert B., U.S. orthopedic surgeon, 1873-1956.
Osgood femoral supracondylar osteotomy
Osgood modified technique
Osgood operation
Osgood rotational osteotomy
Osgood-Schlatter disease - epiphysial aseptic necrosis of the tibial tubercle. Synonym(s): apophysitis tibialis adolescentium; Schlatter disease; Schlatter-Osgood disease
Schlatter-Osgood disease - Synonym(s): Osgood-Schlatter disease

Schlatter,

Carl, Swiss surgeon, 1864-1934.
Osgood-Schlatter disease - see under Osgood
Schlatter disease - Synonym(s): Osgood-Schlatter disease
Schlatter-Osgood disease - Synonym(s): Osgood-Schlatter disease

Osgood-Schlatter disease

osteochondritis/apophysitis of the tibial tubercle (tuberosity). Described by both Osgood and Schlatter (American and Swiss surgeons) in 1903. An 'overuse' injury, which produces pain (due to inflammation) at the attachment of the patellar tendon to the tibial tubercle at an age when this is not fully developed. Most common around puberty/adolescence (rapid skeletal growth), in boys more than girls, who take part in repeated or multiple sports, especially those with repetitive running (football, athletics) or with repeated knee bending and jumping (athletics, gymnastics). Some authors suggest up to 50% are precipitated by trauma. Symptoms include swelling, pain and tenderness on direct pressure, and pain (felt precisely on the tibial tubercle) during exercise and contraction of the quads. Heals spontaneously, with no individual treatment shown to be particularly helpful, except reduction in activity to levels where symptoms are acceptable. Rarely leads to problems in later life.
Osgood-Schlatter disease osteochondritis, presenting as traction apophysitis or traumatic damage due to aseptic (ischaemic) necrosis of tibial tuberosity, classically affecting 11-15-year-old children (see Table 1and Table 2)
Table 1: Classifications of osteochondritis in the lower limb
Criterion 11. OC of the primary articular epiphysis (e.g. Freiberg's disease of the metatarsal head; Kohler's disease of the navicular)
2. OC of the secondary articular epiphysis (e.g. osteochondritis dissecans of the talus)
3. OC of the non-articular epiphysis (e.g. Osgood-Schlatter disease of the tibial tuberosity; Iselin's disease of the styloid process of the fifth metatarsal)
Criterion 21. Crushing apophysitis (e.g. Freiberg's disease) where the pressure of the base of the adjacent phalanx causes an 'eggshell fracture' of the affected metatarsal head
2. Traction or distraction apophysitis (e.g. Sever's disease; Iselin's disease; Osgood-Schlatter disease) where traction at the tendon insertion distracts a secondary centre of ossification from the body of the calcaneum, fifth metatarsal or tibia respectively
3. Fragmentation apophysitis (e.g. osteochondritis dissecans) in which the cortical bone overlying the enchondral defect fractures and separates to create a loose body within the joint
Two criteria may be used to classify osteochondritis:
• criterion 1 relates to the anatomical location of the enchondral ossification defect
• criterion 2 relates to the effects on the diseased bone brought about by the local forces that act on the bone.
Table 2: Presentations of osteochondritis/osteochondrosis in the leg and foot
OCSite affectedTypeAge of onset (years)
Blount's diseaseProximal tibial epiphysisUnderdevelopment of medial epiphysis1-3; 6-13
Buschke's diseaseCuneiformsOssification anomaly11-15
Freiberg's diseaseSecond/third metatarsal headCrushing OC12-18
Iselin's diseaseBase of fifth metatarsalTraction apophysitis11-15
Kohler's diseaseNavicularCrushing OC3-7
Legg-Calve-Perthe diseaseCapital femoral epiphysisTrue OC2-16
Osgood-Schlatter diseaseTibial tuberosityTrauma-related11-15
Osteochondritis dissecansTalar dome
Lateral femoral condyle of knee
Osteonecrosis12-18
Sever's diseaseCalcaneal apophysisTraction apophysitis10-14
Sinding-Larson-Johansson diseasePatellaTraction apophysitis10-14
Treve's diseaseSesamoids (1 MTPJ)True OC15-20

1 MTPJ, first metatarsophalangeal joint.

Osgood-Schlatter disease

avulsion of the tuberosity of the tibia, usually seen in puppies. Similar, but not identical to the disease seen in humans. Called also Schlatter-Osgood disease.