dyskinesia

(redirected from Orofacial dyskinesia)
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Related to Orofacial dyskinesia: tardive dyskinesia

dyskinesia

 [dis-ki-ne´zhah]
impairment of the power of voluntary movement.
primary ciliary dyskinesia any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways; often there is also lack of motion of sperm. One variety is Kartagener's syndrome.
tardive dyskinesia an iatrogenic disorder produced by long-term administration of antipsychotic agents; it is characterized by oral-lingual-buccal dyskinesias that usually resemble continual chewing motions with intermittent darting movements of the tongue; there may also be choreoathetoid movements of the extremities. The disorder is more common in women than in men and in the elderly than in the young, and incidence is related to drug dosage and duration of treatment. In some patients symptoms disappear within several months after antipsychotic drugs are withdrawn; in others symptoms may persist indefinitely.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(dis'ki-nē'zē-ă), [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
Synonym(s): dyscinesia, dyskinesis
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

(dĭs′kə-nē′zhə, -kī-)
n.
An impairment in the ability to control movements, characterized by spasmodic or repetitive motions or lack of coordination.

dyskinesia

Neurology An alteration in muscle movement. See Biliary dyskinesia, Tardive dyskinesia.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă)
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements. Term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

Involuntary jerky or slow writhing movements, often of a fixed pattern. The dyskinesias include the TICS, MYOCLONUS, CHOREA and ATHETOSIS.

Dyskinesia

Impaired ability to make voluntary movements.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă) [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; usually in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]