organic disease

(redirected from Organic symptom)
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Related to Organic symptom: organic disease, Organic cause, Organic basis

organic

 [or-gan´ik]
1. pertaining to an organ or organs.
2. having an organized structure.
3. arising from an organism.
4. pertaining to substances derived from living organisms.
5. denoting chemical substances containing covalently bonded carbon atoms.
6. pertaining to or cultivated by use of animal or vegetable fertilizers, rather than synthetic chemicals.
organic anxiety syndrome a term used in a former system of classification for an organic mental syndrome characterized by prominent, recurrent panic attacks or generalized anxiety caused by a specific organic factor and not associated with delirium. Such disorders are now mainly classified as substance-induced anxiety disorders and anxiety disorders due to a general medical condition. See also substance-induced disorders.
organic brain syndrome organic mental syndrome.
organic delusional syndrome a term used in a former system of classification, denoting an organic mental syndrome characterized by delusions caused by a specific organic factor and not associated with clouding of consciousness (delirium), intellectual impairment (dementia), or prominent hallucinations (organic hallucinosis). The disorders are now mainly classified as substance-induced psychotic disorders and psychotic disorders due to a general medical condition. See also substance-induced disorders.
organic disease a disease due to or accompanied by structural changes in organs or tissues.
organic mental disorder a term formerly used to denote any mental disorder with a specifically known or presumed organic etiology; now discouraged because of the implication that other disorders do not have an organic basis. The term was sometimes used as a synonym of organic mental syndrome.
organic mental syndrome former term for a constellation of psychological or behavioral signs and symptoms associated with brain dysfunction of unknown or unspecified etiology, grouped according to symptoms (see also organic mental disorder). The designating of certain conditions as having an organic basis, possibly implying that other conditions do not, is currently discouraged.
organic mood syndrome a term used in a former system of classification, denoting an organic mental syndrome characterized by manic or depressive mood disturbance caused by a specific organic factor and not associated with clouding of consciousness (delirium), intellectual impairment (dementia), or prominent delusions or hallucinations (organic delusional syndrome or organic hallucinosis). Such disorders are now mainly classified as substance-induced mood disorders and mood disorders due to a general medical condition. See also substance-induced disorders.
organic personality syndrome former term for an organic mental syndrome characterized by a marked change in behavior or personality, e.g., emotional instability, marked apathy, or impaired impulse control, caused by a specific organic factor and not associated with delirium, prominent mood disturbance, delusions, or hallucinations. Such disorders are now mainly classified on the basis of etiology, such as those that are substance-induced or are due to a general medical condition.

or·gan·ic dis·ease

a disease in which anatomic or pathophysiologic changes occur in some bodily tissue or organ, in contrast to a functional disorder; particularly one of psychogenic origin.

or·gan·ic dis·ease

(ōr-gan'ik di-zēz')
A disease with anatomic or pathophysiologic changes in some bodily tissue or organ, in contrast to a disorder of psychogenic origin.

or·gan·ic dis·ease

(ōr-gan'ik di-zēz')
Disorder in which anatomic or pathophysiologic changes occur in some bodily tissue or organ, in contrast to a functional disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, those with more than one psychosomatic symptom were more likely than others to have more than one organic symptom as well, this being the case for nearly half of the girls.
Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to show the relationship between the number of psychosomatic and the number of organic symptoms. The relationships between each individual psychosomatic complaint and the total number of additional psychosomatic complaints reported when each specific complaint was present were determined.
They often wonder about multiple aetiologies and about the existence of mechanisms that generate behavioural copies of the organic symptoms; or they postulate the hypothesis that the expressional systems in the human may have a narrow repertoire and act as final common pathways to a variety of triggers, some organic, some semantic.