offal

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offal

(of′fel)
Animal parts discarded during the process of butchering or slaughtering, typically including the brain, viscera, skin, hooves, and blood. These by-products have been implicated in the transmission of some infectious illnesses, like mad cow disease.

offal

1. nonmeat edible products from animal slaughter. Includes brains, thymus, pancreas, liver, heart, kidney, tripes, sausage casings, chitterlings, crackling rind.
2. by-product of milling, called also weatlings, middlings. A high-protein supplement for herbivores.

specified bovine offal
the term used in the UK to denote tissues that can be infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), namely brain and spinal cord, spinal ganglia, retina, and terminal small intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The extent that one should worry about these cholesterol and fat figures depends on how often one eats these organ meats.
All organ meats are high in cholesterol, especially brains, and mostly low in sodium
Maternal consumption of organ meat and local dairy products was associated with higher and smoking and previous lactation with lower [SIGMA]PCB levels.
Wash the organ meats and boil for 2 or more hours in salted water.
The main dietary sources of cholesterol are egg yolks, organ meats, shellfish and dairy products - not the low or no fat kind.
This low-protein regime restricts the amino acid choline, a building block of protein naturally found in high concentrations in fish, eggs, beans, and organ meats.
Vitamin B1: Organ meats, brewers' yeast, kidney beans, salmon
The highest iron concentrations are found in organ meats, such as liver.
Egg yolks and organ meats (liver, kidney, sweetbread, brain) are particularly rich sources of cholesterol.
Because the body does not make this mineral naturally, optimal levels of chromium must be obtained through food, such as brewer's yeast, leafy green vegetables and organ meats or via nutritional supplements.
Use fresh, raw chicken within one- to two days of purchase, meats within three to four days, and throw away ground meats, sausage and organ meats after two days.
Choline is a nutrient that most of us don't get enough of, according to nationally representative data by the CDC, Dietary sources are nuts, seeds, egg yolks, and organ meats.