inclination

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Related to Orbital inclination: Inclination angle

inclination

 [in″klĭ-na´shun]
a sloping or leaning; the angle of deviation from a particular line or plane of reference.
inclination of the pelvis the angle between the plane of the pelvic inlet and the horizontal plane.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cli·na·tion

(in'kli-nā'shŭn), [TA]
1. A leaning or sloping.
2. In dentistry, deviation of the long axis of a tooth from the perpendicular.
Synonym(s): inclinatio [TA], version (3)
[L. inclinatio, a leaning]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·cli·na·tion

(in'kli-nā'shŭn) [TA]
1. A leaning or sloping.
2. dentistry Deviation of the long axis of a tooth from the perpendicular.
Synonym(s): version (3) .
[L. inclinatio, a leaning]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·cli·na·tion

(in'kli-nā'shŭn) [TA]
In dentistry, deviation of the long axis of a tooth from the perpendicular.
[L. inclinatio, a leaning]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The results showed that different orbital inclinations had no obvious influence on the Mars orbit determination.
An interesting clue is that some hot Jupiters have very strange orbital inclinations, orbiting their star in the opposite direction to the star's rotation or in polar orbits.
They take less than a year to complete a single orbit and carry very similar orbital inclinations and distances - a fact that led the team to posit that they may have formed from a much larger moon which probably broke into pieces in the past.
If IOC objects are captured extrasolar objects, they should have an assortment of orbital inclinations to the ecliptic, as capture should not strongly depend on the direction the objects came from.
Their orbital inclinations are 15[degrees] and 11[degrees], respectively, which is why Ceres crosses such non-zodiacal constellations as Piscis Austrinus and Microscopium.
The problem stems from the fact that only 1 percent of solar-type stars have hot Jupiters, and only 10 percent of these planets will have orbital inclinations that will cause them to glide across their parent star.
Now Maciej Konacki (Caltech) and Wolszczan say they have tracked the interactions between the two planets well enough to derive the planets' masses directly, independently of their unknown orbital inclinations. In a paper to appear in Astrophysical Journal Letters, they find values of 4.3 [+ or -] 0.2 and 3.9 [+ or -] 0.2 Earth masses (assuming a standard pulsar mass of 1.4 Suns).