route of administration

(redirected from Orally ingested)

route of administration

[ro̅o̅t, rout]
Etymology: Fr, route, course; L, administrare, to serve
(of a drug) any one of the body systems in which a drug may be administered, such as intradermally, intrathecally, intramuscularly, intranasally, intravenously, orally, rectally, subcutaneously, sublingually, topically, or vaginally. Some medications can be given by only one route because absorption or maximum effectiveness occurs by that route only or because the specific substance is toxic or damaging when given by another route.

route of administration,

n the path by which a substance is taken into the body (i.e., by mouth, injection, inhalation, rectum, or by application). See also dosage form.
References in periodicals archive ?
Methylone is a rock-form drug that can be ground and snorted, orally ingested or melted and injected.
In another clinical study, pea protein was tested alongside whey in an orally ingested meal, and an analysis of gut hormones suggested that pea protein and whey have similar satiating effects.
Friedman interests centered on the possible application of orally ingested probiotic bacteria as therapy for kidney failure without the need for dialysis.
a1/4[currency]e[paragraph]a**e a[R] , who has more than 67,000 followers and is a burn unit physician in a Beijing hospital, wrote on his Weibo account that orally ingested collagen, which is a popular product with Chinese women as it is believed to keep the skin firm, is a scam.
This study, which enrolled 26 women between the ages of 35 to 59, demonstrated the safety and significant efficacy of orally ingested BioCell Collagen in improving the visible signs of aging and dermal aging parameters measured with bioinstrumentation, according to the company.
We therefore conclude that orally ingested curcumin reverses many of the inflammatory and metabolic derangements associated with obesity and improves glycemic control in mouse models of type 2 diabetes.
Limited evidence suggests that particularly high exposure levels may result from orally ingested medicinal products containing phthalates as excipients (inactive ingredients).
However, ensuring the survival of such orally ingested micro-organisms in the digestive tract is no easy task.
Asenapine was formulated in a sublingual tablet because it is not bioavailable if orally ingested.
Topical Indaflex delivery, the company hopes, may circumvent the significant GI side-effects commonly found with orally ingested NSAID's.
The challenge is to ensure the survival and activity of the orally ingested micro-organisms within the harsh environment of the human digestive tract.
Interestingly, the Cosmetic Products (Safety) Regulations 1996 (SI 1996/2925) explicitly exclude orally ingested products from their scope of application.