hypoglycemic

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hypoglycemic

 [hi″po-gli-se´mik]
1. pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycemia.
2. a hypoglycemic agent.

hy·po·gly·ce·mic

(hī'pō-glī-sē'mik),
Pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycemia.

hypoglycemic

/hy·po·gly·ce·mic/ (-gli-sēm´ik)
1. pertaining to, characterized by, or causing hypoglycemia.
2. an agent that lowers blood glucose levels.

hypoglycemic

(hī′pō-glī-sē′mĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to hypoglycemia.
2. Lowering the concentration of glucose in the blood: a hypoglycemic drug.

hypoglycemic

[-glīsē′mik]
Etymology: Gk, hypo, under, glykys, sweet, haima, blood
pertaining to or resembling a state of low blood glucose level. Also spelled hypoglycaemic.

hypoglycemic

adjective Referring to hypoglycemia, see there.

hy·po·gly·ce·mic

(hī'pō-glī-sē'mik)
Pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycemia.
Synonym(s): hypoglycaemic.

hy·po·gly·ce·mic

(hī'pō-glī-sē'mik)
Pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycemia.
Synonym(s): hypoglycaemic.

hypoglycemic

pertaining to, characterized by, or producing hypoglycemia.

hypoglycemic crisis
profound weakness and seizures may be caused by very low blood glucose levels. Untreated hyperinsulinism and overdosing with insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus are common causes.
hypoglycemic encephalopathy
degenerative lesions in brain tissue caused by prolonged hypoglycemia, as in pregnancy toxemia of ewes.
oral hypoglycemic agents
synthetic drugs that lower the blood sugar level. These drugs stimulate the synthesis and release of insulin from the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, and are used to treat human patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. They have limited use in dogs and cats with diabetes mellitus as they have nonfunctional beta cells that cannot produce insulin.
hypoglycemic factor
see insulin.
hypoglycemic seizures
see hypoglycemic crisis (above).

Patient discussion about hypoglycemic

Q. What is hypoglycemia? What exactly is hypoglycemia and why is it so dangerous?

A. Hypoglycemia is the sudden decrease in blood glucose levels, to an amount where the body experiences signs and symptoms such as confusion, fast heart rate, altered consciousness state and even fainting. This is usually a result of medications taken for diabetes. In most cases, hypoglycemia is treated with sugary drinks or food. In severe cases, an injection of glucagon (a hormone with the opposite effects of insulin) or an intravenous infusion of dextrose is used for treatment, but usually only if the person is unconscious.

Q. I have Type II Diabetes, but have regular problems with low blood sugar levels. What should I do? I am an over 60 female who has been diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. I was originally on Metformin, but my doctor discontinued it because I was having severe low blood sugar levels a lot (as low as 40). I have heard that putting me on insulin might help, but I don't see how since I have more low than high levels. Anyone have any suggestions or information about what I can do? (I do follow diabetic eating with proper food and frequent small meals, but that doesn't seem to help.)

A. i'm not sure about this but maybe because of your sensitivity to Metformin they want to move to insulin shots because they want accuracy. but as all it sounds a bit strange, cause most of the times they save that as a last resort. there's probably something else that's missing here...you asked them why insulin shots?

More discussions about hypoglycemic
References in periodicals archive ?
We focused the main study on utilization of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) used to maintain glycemic control in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.
double dagger]) Oral hypoglycemic agents included [alpha]-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, glinides, glitazones, sulfonylureas, and thiazolidinediones.
Dhulkotia JS, Ola B, Fraser R, Farrell Z Oral hypoglycemic agents us insulin in management of gestational diabetes: a systematic review and metaanalysis.
The primary end point--glycemic control at 12 months without the use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin--was achieved by significantly more patients in the gastric bypass group (93%) than in the sleeve gastrectomy group (47%).
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether use of oral hypoglycemic agents is associated with an altered breast cancer risk in women.
Currently, there are six major classes of oral hypoglycemic agents available in the United States: agents that stimulate insulin secretion (sulfonylureas and rapid-acting secretagogues); reduce hepatic glucose production (biguanides); delay digestion and absorption of intestinal carbohydrates ([alpha]-glucosidase inhibitors); improve insulin action (thiazolidin-ediones [TZDs]); or inhibit glucagon release (dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 [DPP-4] inhibitors).
Gingko and garlic have increased the risk of bleeding with anticoagulants, while garlic has increased the hepatotoxicity of paracetamol and enhanced the effect of oral hypoglycemic agents.
The procedure maintained its effect through 3 years of follow-up, during which the patients significantly lowered their use of oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin.
According to mode of therapy, the prevalence of PAD was found to be 20% in diabetics taking oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin, 27.
The generic drug company's donations include packages of cephalosporin, semisynthetic penicillin, and cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and oral hypoglycemic agents.
Insulin, oral hypoglycemic agents and pancreatic transplantation continue to be treatment options.
All subjects had elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels above the American Diabetes Association's (ADA) recommendation of 7% or less, despite consumption of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) for at least six months prior.