hypoglycemic

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hypoglycemic

 [hi″po-gli-se´mik]
1. pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycemia.
2. a hypoglycemic agent.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·po·gly·ce·mic

(hī'pō-glī-sē'mik),
Pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycemia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hypoglycemic

(hī′pō-glī-sē′mĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to hypoglycemia.
2. Lowering the concentration of glucose in the blood: a hypoglycemic drug.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hypoglycemic

adjective Referring to hypoglycemia, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hy·po·gly·ce·mic

(hī'pō-glī-sē'mik)
Pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycemia.
Synonym(s): hypoglycaemic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hy·po·gly·ce·mic

(hī'pō-glī-sē'mik)
Pertaining to or characterized by hypoglycemia.
Synonym(s): hypoglycaemic.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about hypoglycemic

Q. What is hypoglycemia? What exactly is hypoglycemia and why is it so dangerous?

A. Hypoglycemia is the sudden decrease in blood glucose levels, to an amount where the body experiences signs and symptoms such as confusion, fast heart rate, altered consciousness state and even fainting. This is usually a result of medications taken for diabetes. In most cases, hypoglycemia is treated with sugary drinks or food. In severe cases, an injection of glucagon (a hormone with the opposite effects of insulin) or an intravenous infusion of dextrose is used for treatment, but usually only if the person is unconscious.

Q. I have Type II Diabetes, but have regular problems with low blood sugar levels. What should I do? I am an over 60 female who has been diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. I was originally on Metformin, but my doctor discontinued it because I was having severe low blood sugar levels a lot (as low as 40). I have heard that putting me on insulin might help, but I don't see how since I have more low than high levels. Anyone have any suggestions or information about what I can do? (I do follow diabetic eating with proper food and frequent small meals, but that doesn't seem to help.)

A. i'm not sure about this but maybe because of your sensitivity to Metformin they want to move to insulin shots because they want accuracy. but as all it sounds a bit strange, cause most of the times they save that as a last resort. there's probably something else that's missing here...you asked them why insulin shots?

More discussions about hypoglycemic
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References in periodicals archive ?
Drug history revealed 21 (11.6%) were taking oral hypoglycemic agents, 5 (2.8%) calcium channel antagonists and 3 (1.7%) were on beta blockers.
daily; OHA: Oral hypoglycemic agents; P: Placebo; PIO: Ploglitazone; S: Sitagliptin; SGLT-2: Sodium-glucose co transporter type 2; SU: Sulphonylurea; W: weeks.
Oral hypoglycemic agents can cause life-threatening syndromes in healthy patients and can clinically mimic large, intentional overdoses.
[6-8] Thereafter, from 2011 onward a rise in the prescription rates was observed with newer oral hypoglycemic agents such as DPP4 inhibitors such as sitagliptin, and vildagliptin, and [alpha]-glucosidase inhibitors such as voglibose in combination with metformin.
Out of 20 patients who have HbA1c <6.5%, all were taking oral hypoglycemic agents. Out of 180 patients who had HbA1c [greater than or equal to]6.5%, 94 were on oral hypoglycemic drugs, 63 were on combination of oral hypoglycemic and insulin, 19 were on insulin alone and 4 patients were on management by diet control (Table 1).
Regarding their medication regimens, the number of patients on hypoglycemia-inducing oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs), namely, sulfonylureas and meglitinide analogues, insulin, or both, was 36, 215, and 18, respectively.
To determine the magnitude and mechanisms of response to Medicare Part D cost sharing by low-income subsidy (LIS) recipients using oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) and statins.
Almost 41.6% patients who were taking oral hypoglycemic agents had poor glycemic control while only 27.2% who were on combination therapy insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents had poor glycemic control.
A longitudinal observational study was conducted on Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on oral hypoglycemic agents, attending Diabetes Clinic of College of Medicine and JNM Hospital, Kalyani, a tertiary care teaching hospital in West Bengal between April and September 2013.
The preparations were taken alone, or concurrently with oral hypoglycemic agents, with or without insulin.
More patients taking liraglutide than placebo were able to reduce their use of oral hypoglycemic agents. Liraglutide also improved cardiovascular measures such as systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein.
Typically, however, patients with GCK MODY are treated--inappropriately--with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents because they have been misdiagnosed as having type 2 or less commonly type 1 diabetes.