bioavailability

(redirected from Oral bioavailability)
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bioavailability

 [bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te]
the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē),
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that is absorbed into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

/bio·avail·a·bil·i·ty/ (bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te) the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bioavailability

(bī′ō-ə-vā′lə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The degree to which or rate at which a drug or other substance is absorbed or becomes available at the site of physiological activity after administration.

bi′o·a·vail′a·ble (-lə-bəl) adj.

bioavailability

[-əvā′libil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + ME, availen, to serve
the degree of activity or amount of an administered drug or other substance that becomes available for activity in the target tissue.

bioavailability

The rate and extent to which a drug is available to serve as a substrate, bind to a specific molecule or participate in biochemical reactions in a target tissue after administration. For oral agents, bioavailability reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption.

Bioavailability depends on the pI (isoelectric point), the pH of a solution in which the solute does not migrate (ionic form), presence of side chains or the conformation of the epitope. Bioavailability is affected by the route of administration, rate of metabolism, lipid solubility and binding proteins. It is usually < 100% due to degradation or alteration before reaching the target tissue.

bioavailability

Clinical pharmacology The degree to which a drug is available to a target tissue after administration which, for oral drugs, reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption; BA is the in vivo presence of a substance in a form that allows it to be metabolized, serve as a substrate, bind a specific molecule, or participate in biochemical reactions. See Oral bioavailability.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that becomes available to exert a pharmacologic effect into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

The amount of a drug that reaches the blood regardless of how it is given. After intravenous injection bioavailability is 100%, but the bioavailability of drugs given by mouth is often much less, because many drugs are broken down by the digestive enzymes and many are poorly absorbed.

Bioavailability

A measure of the amount of drug that is actually absorbed from a given dose.
Mentioned in: Antiretroviral Drugs

bioavailability

physiological availability of a given amount of drug

bioavailability (bīˈ·ō··vālˈ··bilˑ·i·tē),

n the amount of or rate at which a substance or drug is accessible to the body.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
Physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency.

bioavailability

the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.
References in periodicals archive ?
The technology is currently the subject of several active external development programs and, according to the company, has proven effective over the last decade to enable the safe delivery of peptide-based therapeutics and other molecules with low oral bioavailability.
According to the contract, the primary aim of the new generation compound is to possess oral bioavailability while maintaining Istaroxime's dual luso-inotropic function.
Developed in our previous study, this model combines druglikeness evaluation, oral bioavailability prediction, multiple drug targets prediction as well as network pharmacology techniques.
Pharmaxis has developed it through to phase 1 clinical studies, demonstrating oral bioavailability, long-lasting target inhibition and good tolerability and safety.
central nervous system toxicity) when the oral bioavailability of PTX is substantially increased by concomitant inhibition of CYP3A and P-gp (van Waterschoot et al.
Among the topics are the in vivo evaluation of acute and chronic nanotoxicity, nanoparticles and plants from toxicity to activism of growth, factors affecting the oral bioavailability of nanomaterials, human stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes in drug discovery and toxicity testing, epigenetic modeling and stem cells in toxicology testing, and using video bioinformatic tools in stem cell toxicology.
For a BCS class-III drug we need to increase its permeability to improve its oral bioavailability because, here, in class III drugs they have high solubility but low permeability.
The study results overall demonstrate a high oral bioavailability for SF, and a rapid tissue clearance rate.
The oral bioavailability of affected drugs is increased but their half life usually remains unaltered (11,12).
of the Pacific) offer a guide to understanding oral bioavailability, to help chemists, biologists, life science researchers, pharmaceutical scientists, pharmacologists, clinicians, and graduate students become familiar with its fundamentals and practices in pharmaceutical research and drug development and solve problems in the development of drugs for oral administration.
22 December 2010 - Irish Merrion Pharmaceuticals (IEX: MERR) said today it has struck an agreement with Danish pharma company Novo Nordisk A/S (CPH: NOVO B) to evaluate the ability of Merrion's patented Gipet technology to boost the oral bioavailability of an unnamed compound.
there is very low oral bioavailability of the parent substance, BPA [bisphenol A], in humans and other primates" and that because of the "rapid biotransformation and excretion and plasma protein binding in humans, peak BPA concentrations after dietary exposures to BPA available for receptor binding are predicted to be very low even in worst case exposure scenarios.