optimistic bias

(redirected from Optimism bias)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

optimistic bias

(op″tĭ-mis′tik)
The tendency of people beginning a course of treatment to assume that it will succeed even when the outcome is uncertain. Thus investigators tend to assume that their research will yield positive findings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where the future is concerned, Tali Sharot explains optimism in "The Optimism Bias" (Current Biology, Vol.
Policy designers and those who must implement government projects or infrastructure are often guilty of what's known as (https://www.behavioraleconomics.com/resources/mini-encyclopedia-of-be/optimism-bias/) optimism bias  ("What could possibly go wrong?") when, in fact, they should be looking at the end goal.
In this subsection, the authors explore how the bias blind-spot, Dunning-Kruger effect, hindsight bias, optimism bias, outcome bias, and overconfidence bias all impair leaders' abilities to adequately select from the facts before them to make the best decisions about how to address hazing within their ranks.
Another contributor is the ''optimism bias'', a belief that you are less at risk of experiencing a negative event compared to others.
In her latest book, Political Risk, Condoleezza Rice pointed out the danger of 'optimism bias' in predicting everything from outcome of business investments, sports events, political events and calculations of personal risks.
ROHNERT PARK, Calif: Student loan borrowers with optimism bias may risk falling into default if they expect a future event will enable them to pay down their loans and such expected occurrence fails to take place.
'Optimism bias has been a considerable challenge in the planning and delivery of public services, particularly infrastructure megaprojects,' Siemiatycki said in his paper, titled 'Managing Optimism Biases in the Delivery of Large-Infrastructure Projects: A Corporate Performance Benchmarking Approach.' 'This has resulted in consistently underestimated costs and overestimated benefits, as well as delivery delays.'
biases: availability bias (42) and optimism bias. (43) Both of these
Keywords: Risk Management Optimism Bias, Planning Fallacy, Cognitive Bias Reduction
One of the most robust findings in the field of social cognition over the past 20 years has been regarding optimism bias, wherein people report that they themselves are less likely to experience negative events and are more likely to experience positive events, than others are (Weinstein, 1982).
Scientists call this optimism bias, defined as: "The belief that the future will be much better than the past and present." Apparently, this can be found in every race, region and socioeconomic bracket.
Owing to optimism bias, it is common for individuals to underestimate the likelihood of an accident, illness or injury befalling them.