optimistic bias

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optimistic bias

(op″tĭ-mis′tik)
The tendency of people beginning a course of treatment to assume that it will succeed even when the outcome is uncertain. Thus investigators tend to assume that their research will yield positive findings.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most robust findings in the field of social cognition over the past 20 years has been regarding optimism bias, wherein people report that they themselves are less likely to experience negative events and are more likely to experience positive events, than others are (Weinstein, 1982).
Owing to optimism bias, it is common for individuals to underestimate the likelihood of an accident, illness or injury befalling them.
So, even though on an individual level optimism bias may have catastrophic consequences, on organisational and societal levels it is absolutely crucial for innovation.
63) Tronvig Group, a marketing company that serves museums and non-profits among other clients, suggests that clients develop marketing strategies specifically to exploit consumers' optimism bias.
Our optimism bias lulls us into believing we have abilities that history and experience make clear we do not possess.
Some of the challenges witnessed include lack of regulatory clarity, optimism bias, and weak dispute resolution," he added.
Some of the challenges witnessed include: lack of regulatory clarity, optimism bias, and weak dispute resolution," he added.
The approach looks at three issues: | Optimism bias - where project teams tend to underestimate the cost and timescale of a project, overestimate the benefits and thus achieve a higher benefit-cost ratio (BCR) for presentation to HM Treasury; | Groupthink - a tendency to bolster a collective view of the scheme both inside and outside government and ignore alternative options.
This is known as the optimism bias which Tali Sharot describes in her book 'The Optimism Bias: A Tour of the Irrationally Positive Brain' as "an inclination to overestimate the likelihood of encountering positive events in the future and to underestimate the likelihood of experiencing negative events.
Behavioral biases: Consolidated view, overtrading, optimism bias and risk taking.
Error and Optimism Bias in Tollroad Forecasts," by Robert Bain.