optical tweezers

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optical tweezers

pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
A technique that uses a single-beam laser directed through an objective lens to trap, image, and manipulate micron-sized particles in three dimensions.

optical tweezers

A laser device used to alter or manipulate microorganisms, molecules, or living cells.
See also: optical
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References in periodicals archive ?
[10.] Ashkin, A., "Optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles using lasers," Proc.
As alluded to previously, upon optical trapping not only the translational motion of the sperm is halted, but also a rotational motion is established.
Although optical trapping of single cells may have negligible biological effects, it is highly dependent on the wavelength of laser light and the dosage of irradiation to which cells are exposed (40-42).
"In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the use of arrays of gold Bowtie Nanoantenna Arrays (BNAs) for multipurpose optical trapping and manipulation of submicrometer- to micrometer-sized objects.
Improving the PFS system made it compatible with things like multi-photon imaging and optical trapping, as well as ultraviolet calcium imaging.
The new techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM; or scanning force microscopy) [1-4] and optical trapping (optical or laser tweezers) [5, 6] have allowed us to locate individual atoms and molecules on surfaces and to manipulate cells directly.
The distribution of the orbital angular momentum density is significant to the optical trapping, optical guiding, and optical manipulation.
"In the future," adds Nikon's Schwartz, "such important applications as optical coherent tomography and optical trapping, which are best used with longer wavelengths of light, will also become more widely explored." The full potential of IR microscopy is yet to be discovered.
This approach involves optical trapping technology capable of sensing single antigen-antibody bonds.
Optical antennas have been widely employed as nanosources for higher harmonic light [4, 5], thermal emitters [6], plasmonic sensors [7, 8], and in applications such as photodetection or spontaneous emission efficiency enhancement [9,10], optical trapping, stacking and sorting [11], and subwavelength field confinement [12].

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