sexism

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sexism

[sek′sizəm]
a belief that one sex is superior to the other and that the superior sex has endowments, rights, prerogatives, and status greater than those of the inferior sex. Sexism results in discrimination in all areas of life and acts as a limiting factor in educational, professional, and psychological development. sexist, n., adj.
The belief or attitude that one sex is inferior, less competent, or valuable than the other

sex·ism

(seks'izm)
Attitudes and practices that place different values on, or create unequal opportunities for, people because of their gender.

sexism

All of the actions and attitudes that relegate individuals of either sex to a secondary and inferior status in society.
References in periodicals archive ?
Human control over the reproductive capacity of dogs is laid out and compared to the oppression of women.
Professors from leading educational institutes like the London School and Economics, the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, School of African and Asian Studies, Delhi University and Jadavpur University and members of groups like the Citizen's Forum for Civil Liberties, Forum Against Oppression of Women, Mumbai.
He also advocated the oppression of women, saying of young girls that "she should start hijab from the age of seven, by the age of ten it becomes an obligation on us to force her to wear hijab and if she doesn't wear hijab, we hit her".
In France, it is commonplace to view headscarves as male oppression of women, not as a free choice by wearers.
It is not surprising that classical liberals are not moved to action by feminist calls to the barricades when some feminists claim the right to ban prostitution and Playboy magazine, argue that the state ought to provide daycare and abortion services on demand (for 'free'), and blame the oppression of women (and most otherwoes) on 'capitalism.
The bishop also criticized opponents of a draft law aimed at protecting women from domestic violence, asking: "How can it be that in the 21st century a [draft] law combating the oppression of women and violence against them is rejected?
But the systemic oppression of women tends to be cast in terms of claims for empathy: we shouldn't follow these policies because they are not nice, not enlightened.
ACCORDING TO AMERICAN JOURNALISTS NICHOLAS KRISTOF AND SHERYL WUDUNN, the predominant injustice of our times is the widespread, tyrannical oppression of women.
From the first part, "Engaging with Tradition," to the final part of the work, "Standing at the Edge of Time: African Women's Visions of the Past, Present, and Future," the anthology focuses on how tradition supports the oppression of women ("Interview with Elisabeth Bouanga"), how AIDS disrupts the family unit ("Slow Poison"), how so-called revolutionary moments are unable to sustain the promise of women's freedom ("The Good Woman"), and how the practice of polygamy paradoxically empowers and oppresses women ("The Battle of the Words").
Is it the advocacy of human sacrifice (Mathew 27), the oppression of women (Exodus 21:7), the threats made on the lives of homosexuals (Leviticus 20:13), or the sanctioning of genocide and slavery (Samuel 15:2 and Exodus 21:20)?
Supporters of the law say that burkas and similar garments challenge France's secular values and symoblise the inferiority and oppression of women.
We think HRW would do better to focus more attention on serious issues overseas, including the oppression of women, persecution of political minorities, slavery and human trafficking, and the slaughter of innocent civilians on the part of governments in many parts of the world.