Oppenheim


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Op·pen·heim

(op'en-hīm),
Hermann, Berlin neurologist, 1858-1919. See: Oppenheim disease, Oppenheim reflex, Oppenheim syndrome, Ziehen-Oppenheim disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fragile Forts: The Fixed Defences of Sydney Harbour 1788-1963, by Peter Oppenheim, Australian Military History Publications, Loft-us, NSW, 2005, 180 x 250 mm (landscape), pp.
PAT EDDERY is the star attraction at Cologne today, where he heads a strong British challenge for the Oppenheim Pramerica Hedgefonds Ex Champion- Rennen, a one-mile-three-furlong handicap for veteran jockeys which has attracted 11 runners, writes David Conolly-Smith.
Offering a hedonistic lifestyle alternative is Ten Museum Park, designed by renowned architect Chad Oppenheim and set to be built by 2006 as a Clinique La Prairie spa community.
MPA executive vice president and chief marketing officer Ellen Oppenheim notes that magazines lead television, radio and newspapers in encouraging consumers to maintain medication schedules.
Oppenheim Immobilien-KAG has purchased Princes Way in Solihull in a landmark deal worth around pounds 21 million.
Phillip Oppenheim plans to allow girlie magazines Penthouse and Men Only to take pictures of nude beauties at his Cubana diner.
Cuomo and Alan V Oppenheim of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology demonstrated that such synchronized circuits could be used for communication.
Playboy Trade Minister Phillip Oppenheim admitted having had an affair with his female farm hand.
Oppenheim's first novel, Expiation (1886), and subsequent thrillers won him the attention of a wealthy New York businessman who gave Oppenheim a high-paying job and freed him to devote most of his time to writing.
Using an empirical methodology that ranges widely in medical and literary sources, Oppenheim demonstrates how the metaphor of nervous exhaustion was understood by both medical and lay figures and how the connotations of "shattered nerves" changed between the early nineteenth century and World War I due to the combined impact of evangelicalism, industrialization, and psychiatric and physiological ideas.
Janet Oppenheim, "Shattered Nerves": Doctors, Patients, and Depression in Victorian England (Oxford UP, 1990), 338 pp.