opiate receptor

(redirected from Opioid receptor)
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opiate receptor

A specific site on a cell surface that interacts in a highly selective fashion with opiate drugs. These receptors mediate the major known pharmacological actions and side effects of opiates and the functions of the endogenous opiate-like substances (endorphins and enkephalins).
See also: receptor
References in periodicals archive ?
Wainwright analyst Oren Livnat analyst raised his price target for Cara Therapeutics to $31 from $28 after the company announced that the ongoing Phase 2 of oral Korsuva - its novel kappa opioid receptor agonist - in stage III-V chronic kidney disease associated pruritus in non-hemodialysis patients is fully enrolled and will not be up-sized from the original n=240 sample after the prespecified interim conditional powering analysis.
During the meeting, Rick Altis made a presentation on naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist used to treat people with opioid addiction and alcoholism.
Among the most positive outcomes achieved were those in which promising newer treatments, including targeting IL-31 signaling and opioid receptor modulation, were used.
Apparently a team of scientists from Wake Forest School of Medicine has created a new chemical compound called AT-121 that works on both the mu opioid receptor, which is found in most painkillers, and the nociception receptor, which blocks addiction of mu opioids.
Opioids affect the respiratory rhythm centres of the brainstem, causing slower and irregular respirations, which become increasingly shallow as opioid receptor activation increases.
Conversely, if a patient has been treated with naltrexone for an extended period, a lack of tolerance may increase the risk of respiratory depression with opioid administration due to upregulation of the opioid receptor. (2)
Mammalian opioid receptor genes display splicing patterns leading to several receptor variants that are functionally important in opioid-induced analgesia.
The main objective of this study was to design and test a chemical compound that would work on both the mu opioid receptor, the main component in the most effective prescription painkillers, and the nociceptin receptor, which opposes or blocks the abuse and dependence-related side effects of mu-targeted opioids.
Pharmacist Stephen Dickson provides a comprehensive history of the opium poppy and the subsequent creation of synthetic drug compounds called opiates, which are all active at the opioid receptor sites.
In the state of acute withdrawal, the opioid receptor sites in the brain scream for more opioids.