opioid peptide

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opioid peptide

Endogenous opiate Any natural polypeptide neurotransmitters involved in perception of pain, response to stress, regulation of appetite, sleep, memory, learning
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Certain Opioid peptides that bind opiate receptors and exert opiate like effects have also been identified from [alpha]S1 casein (Nielsen et al.
In turn, met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, [beta]-endorphin, [alpha]-neo-endorphin, dynorphin, and nociceptin/orphanin are opioid peptides. Leu-enkephalin (L-ENK) was the first time isolated from the porcine brain in 1975.
Bryan Fry, a researcher from the University of Queensland, Australia, said in a statement Thursday: "The fish injects other fish with opioid peptides that act like heroin or morphine, inhibiting pain rather than causing it.
During childhood, the LHRH surge is repressed through inhibitory signals in the hypothalamus mediated by [gamma]-aminobutyric acid and opioid peptides (Terasawa and Fernandez 2001).
ENK are produced from a propeptide precursor, proenkephalin (proENK), which is translated from preproenkephalin mRNA that is encoded by a gene distinct from the other endogenous opioid peptides [19, 20].
Acupuncture related to the release of endogenous opioid peptides (enkephalin, beta-endorphin and dynorphin) from the central nervous system, and opioids are known to increase dopaminergic neuron activity in the mesolimbic brain region [7, 8].
Additionally, we found that that globulin and prolamins fractions may have antithrombotic and opioid peptides, respectively, which can act as platelet aggregation inhibitors and powerful painkiller [14, 39].
opioid peptides. Opioid activation leads to the processing of opioid peptides from their precursor, proenkephalin and the simultaneous release of antibacterial peptides contained within the precursor as well.
Opioids bind to opiate receptors within the central nervous system (CNS) to activate endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins and enkephalins, and produce a change in perception of pain known as analgesia (Vallerand, Sanoski, & Deglin, 2014).
Met-enkephalin is one of the simplest endogenous opioid peptides within the enkephaline family.