opioid

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Related to Opioid analgesic: Analgesic drugs

opioid

 [o´pe-oid]
1. any synthetic narcotic that has opiate-like activities but is not derived from opium.
2. denoting naturally occurring peptides, such as enkephalins, that exert opiate-like effects by interacting with opiate receptors of cell membranes. See also opioid analgesic.

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd),
Originally, a term denoting synthetic narcotics resembling opiates but increasingly used to refer to both opiates and synthetic narcotics.

opioid

/opi·oid/ (o´pe-oid)
1. any synthetic narcotic that has opiate-like activities but is not derived from opium.
2. any of a group of naturally occurring peptides, e.g., enkephalins, that bind at or otherwise influence opiate receptors, either with opiate-like or opiate antagonist effects.

opioid

(ō′pē-oid′)
n.
Any of various compounds that bind to specific receptors in the central nervous system and have analgesic and narcotic effects, including naturally occurring substances such as morphine; synthetic and semisynthetic drugs such as methadone and oxycodone; and certain peptides produced by the body, such as endorphins. Also called opiate.

o′pi·oid′ adj.

opioid

[ō′pē·oid]
Etymology: Gk, opionm, poppy juice, eidos, form
strictly speaking, pertaining to natural and synthetic chemicals that have opium-like effects similar to morphine, though they are not derived from opium. Examples include endorphins or enkephalins produced by body tissues or synthetic methadone. Morphine and related drugs are often included in this category because the term narcotic has lost its original meaning.

opioid

adjective Referring to opium-like activity, especially on receptors.
 
noun
(1) A drug that has narcotic effects similar to opium (Papaver somniferum) but is not derived from it.
(2) An endogenous peptide (e.g., endorphin) that acts on opioid receptors.

opioid

Neurology A pain-attenuating peptide that occurs naturally in the brain, which induces analgesia by mimicking endogenous opioids at opioid receptors in the brain. See Opioid-mediated analgesia system.
Opioids
Agonists The most potent opioid agonists are morphine, meperidine, methadone; other opioids include hydromorphine–Dilaudid®, codeine, oxycodone–Percodan®, propoxyphene–Darvon®
Antagonists Naloxone–Narcan®
Mixed agonsts-antagonists Pentazocine–Talwin® 

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd)
A narcotic substance, either natural or synthetic.

Opioid

Any morphine-like synthetic narcotic that produces the same effects as drugs derived from the opium poppy (opiates), such as pain relief, sedation, constipation and respiratory depression.
Mentioned in: Anesthesia, General

opioid

any non-morphine-derived narcotic drug, or naturally occurring substance with an opiate-like therapeutic action

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd)
Originally, synthetic narcotics resembling opiates but increasingly used to refer to both opiates and synthetic narcotics.

opioid

1. any synthetic narcotic that has opiate-like activities but is not derived from opium.
2. denoting naturally occurring peptides, e.g. enkephalins, that exert opiate-like effects by interacting with opiate receptors of cell membranes.

endogenous opioid
opioid receptors
specific receptor sites for opioids, named for the drugs which have a high binding affinity for them. The main ones are mu (morphine), kappa (opioid agonist-antagonists such as pentazocine) and delta (enkephalin endogenous opioids). Subtypes exist and others, such as sigma and epsilon, have been identified.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gilson and colleagues (2004) found similar increases in use of opioid analgesics from 1997 to 2002, leading them to surmise based on reports of abuse of varying opioid analgesics in the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) surveillance system that increased medical use of opioid analgesics is associated with increased abuse.
Table 3: Multivariable Regression Models for County-Level Opioid Analgesic Prescription Claim Rates per 1,000 Total Prescription Claims * Parameter Estimate (Robust SE) Model 1 ([dagger]) Intercept 60.
These certified education programs will be designed to ensure that the benefits of ER/LA opioid analgesics outweigh the risks in patients whose clinicians have determined these medications to be an appropriate treatment option.
Leading organisations in Opioid Analgesic research include:
Buprenorphine is a Schedule III controlled substance, meaning that it has been designated as having lower abuse potential than Schedule II drugs, a category that includes most opioid analgesics.
According to data from Wolters Kluwer, the market for opioid analgesics for the treatment of pain totaled nearly $10 billion in 2008.
Onsolis[TM] is an opioid analgesic currently under review by the FDA for the potential management of breakthrough pain in cancer patients who are already receiving and who are tolerant to opioid therapy for their underlying persistent cancer pain.
The Company has a diversified portfolio of four lead products at various stages of development including d-Methadone, its N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist for neuropathic pain; MepiGel, its orphan drug designated topical formulation of the local anesthetic mepivacaine; BuTab ER, its oral dosage form of the opioid analgesic buprenorphine; and LevoCap ER, its abuse resistant, sustained release dosage form of the opioid analgesic levorphanol.
EMBEDA[TM] is a long-acting Schedule II opioid analgesic that King is developing in response to the need for opioid analgesics that have the potential to reduce the risk of misuse and abuse.
We expect that ACUROX[TM] Tablets will be the first approved immediate-release opioid analgesic designed to resist or deter common methods of prescription drug abuse.
Relmada is currently developing LevoCap ER, its abuse resistant, sustained release dosage form of the opioid analgesic levorphanol; d-methadone, its NMDA receptor antagonist for neuropathic pain.
Over the past several months, HHS received similar letters from medical groups, members of Congress, governors and attorneys general expressing concern about FDA's approval of Zohydro, a powerful new opioid analgesic.