opioid

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Related to Opioid analgesic: Analgesic drugs

opioid

 [o´pe-oid]
1. any synthetic narcotic that has opiate-like activities but is not derived from opium.
2. denoting naturally occurring peptides, such as enkephalins, that exert opiate-like effects by interacting with opiate receptors of cell membranes. See also opioid analgesic.

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd),
Originally, a term denoting synthetic narcotics resembling opiates but increasingly used to refer to both opiates and synthetic narcotics.

opioid

/opi·oid/ (o´pe-oid)
1. any synthetic narcotic that has opiate-like activities but is not derived from opium.
2. any of a group of naturally occurring peptides, e.g., enkephalins, that bind at or otherwise influence opiate receptors, either with opiate-like or opiate antagonist effects.

opioid

(ō′pē-oid′)
n.
Any of various compounds that bind to specific receptors in the central nervous system and have analgesic and narcotic effects, including naturally occurring substances such as morphine; synthetic and semisynthetic drugs such as methadone and oxycodone; and certain peptides produced by the body, such as endorphins. Also called opiate.

o′pi·oid′ adj.

opioid

[ō′pē·oid]
Etymology: Gk, opionm, poppy juice, eidos, form
strictly speaking, pertaining to natural and synthetic chemicals that have opium-like effects similar to morphine, though they are not derived from opium. Examples include endorphins or enkephalins produced by body tissues or synthetic methadone. Morphine and related drugs are often included in this category because the term narcotic has lost its original meaning.

opioid

adjective Referring to opium-like activity, especially on receptors.
 
noun
(1) A drug that has narcotic effects similar to opium (Papaver somniferum) but is not derived from it.
(2) An endogenous peptide (e.g., endorphin) that acts on opioid receptors.

opioid

Neurology A pain-attenuating peptide that occurs naturally in the brain, which induces analgesia by mimicking endogenous opioids at opioid receptors in the brain. See Opioid-mediated analgesia system.
Opioids
Agonists The most potent opioid agonists are morphine, meperidine, methadone; other opioids include hydromorphine–Dilaudid®, codeine, oxycodone–Percodan®, propoxyphene–Darvon®
Antagonists Naloxone–Narcan®
Mixed agonsts-antagonists Pentazocine–Talwin® 

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd)
A narcotic substance, either natural or synthetic.

Opioid

Any morphine-like synthetic narcotic that produces the same effects as drugs derived from the opium poppy (opiates), such as pain relief, sedation, constipation and respiratory depression.
Mentioned in: Anesthesia, General

opioid

any non-morphine-derived narcotic drug, or naturally occurring substance with an opiate-like therapeutic action

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd)
Originally, synthetic narcotics resembling opiates but increasingly used to refer to both opiates and synthetic narcotics.

opioid

1. any synthetic narcotic that has opiate-like activities but is not derived from opium.
2. denoting naturally occurring peptides, e.g. enkephalins, that exert opiate-like effects by interacting with opiate receptors of cell membranes.

endogenous opioid
opioid receptors
specific receptor sites for opioids, named for the drugs which have a high binding affinity for them. The main ones are mu (morphine), kappa (opioid agonist-antagonists such as pentazocine) and delta (enkephalin endogenous opioids). Subtypes exist and others, such as sigma and epsilon, have been identified.
References in periodicals archive ?
In February 2016, the FDA received a citizen petition from numerous local and state public health officials and other stakeholders asking the agency to make certain changes to the existing labeling for benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics.
If an opioid analgesic is needed, consider the lowest effective dose of the most effective medication given for the shortest period of time necessary.
However, the sensitivity analysis conducted in the Yazdy et al study suggests that this bias did not account for the association between opioid analgesics and spina bifida.
This increase is a reflection of the dramatic increases in the number of prescriptions, in particular for opioid analgesics, issued by physicians to treat pain.
In following these steps, West Virginia physicians will exercise their responsibility to combat the major drug abuse and diversion problem in our state and play a major role in decreasing the high rate of overdose deaths from opioid analgesics in West Virginia.
Consistent with previous work (Simoni-Wastila, Ritter, and Strickler 2004), the proportion of female subjects in the population and the proportion reporting illicit drug use in the previous month were significant independent predictors of state-level opioid analgesic claims.
To evaluate the impact of the public health interventions, DOHMH assessed changes in unintentional opioid analgesic-involved overdose mortality rates and changes in opioid analgesic prescribing patterns.
Because opioid analgesics are widely used among women of reproductive age for pain, any potential detrimental effects of these drugs during pregnancy clearly are important to a large population of women.
Conventional opioid analgesics can produce withdrawal symptoms after cessation of chronic administration, which can lead to drug craving and opioid misuse.
In conjunction, the Oxycodone Hydrochloride Oral Solution 5mg/5ml is an opioid agonist indicated for the management of moderate to severe pain where the use of an opioid analgesic is appropriate, added the company.
New York state Medicaid enrollees had higher death rates for opioid analgesic poisonings than did those not enrolled in Medicaid, and the differences increased over time (Table).
A warning about the risks of suicide associated with use of the opioid analgesic tramadol in certain patients has been added to the drug's prescribing information, the FDA announced.