opinion

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opinion

[əpin′yən]
Etymology: L, opinari, to suppose
1 (in law) a statement by the court, usually in writing, of the reasoning behind its decision or judgment in a particular case.
2 a statement prepared for a client by an attorney that represents the attorney's understanding of the law as it pertains to a legal question posed by the client.

opinion

A term of art used in clinical studies for judgement and/or the advice provided by an independent ethics committee to sponsors and regulatory bodies

opinion,

n in the law of evidence, an inference or conclusion drawn by a witness from information known to him or her or assumed.

Patient discussion about opinion

Q. Looking for anyone that would like to share information or opinions regarding Fibromyalgia? Do you believe in Fibromyalgia? What are the symptoms? Any good treatments?

A. i have a close friend that suffers from that illness. i have to say that when you look at it from the side it's hard to understand the pain and suffer that involved in this. at first i couldn't see it from her point of view,and i ashamed to say i didn't believe her...
but it took me a while to see that this is a true pain and frustrating it is. it's important to take in mind that poeple that does not suffer from Fybromyalgia have hard times understanding it.

More discussions about opinion
References in classic literature ?
He bore it as long as he could, but when he was appealed to for an opinion, he blazed up with honest indignation and defended religion with all the eloquence of truth--an eloquence which made his broken English musical and his plain face beautiful.
It would be bold, therefore, and possibly unjust, to venture a decisive opinion as to its merits; although it appears to have been at least a matter of doubt, whether Colonel Pyncheon's claim were not unduly stretched, in order to make it cover the small metes and bounds of Matthew Maule.
To sum up the matter, it grew to be a widely diffused opinion that the Rev.
How can a man be satisfied to entertain and opinion merely, and enjoy it?
Still, this is only my opinion, and I am only one man; others, with less experience, may think differently.
Every jay in the whole lot put his eye to the hole and delivered a more chuckle-headed opinion about the mystery than the jay that went there before him.
Edward Ferrars was not recommended to their good opinion by any peculiar graces of person or address.
These alleged in vindication of their opinions that it was reasonable to expect, if they put us to death, that the viceroy of the Indies would come with fire and sword to demand satisfaction.
Of philosophy I will say nothing, except that when I saw that it had been cultivated for many ages by the most distinguished men, and that yet there is not a single matter within its sphere which is not still in dispute, and nothing, therefore, which is above doubt, I did not presume to anticipate that my success would be greater in it than that of others; and further, when I considered the number of conflicting opinions touching a single matter that may be upheld by learned men, while there can be but one true, I reckoned as well-nigh false all that was only probable.
Socrates is afraid that Crito is but pressing upon him the opinions of the many: whereas, all his life long he has followed the dictates of reason only and the opinion of the one wise or skilled man.
If no such cabal should exist, the mere diversity of views and opinions would alone be sufficient to tincture the exercise of the executive authority with a spirit of habitual feebleness and dilatoriness.
We are to recollect that all the existing constitutions were formed in the midst of a danger which repressed the passions most unfriendly to order and concord; of an enthusiastic confidence of the people in their patriotic leaders, which stifled the ordinary diversity of opinions on great national questions; of a universal ardor for new and opposite forms, produced by a universal resentment and indignation against the ancient government; and whilst no spirit of party connected with the changes to be made, or the abuses to be reformed, could mingle its leaven in the operation.