opiate

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opiate

 [o´pe-at]
1. any sedative narcotic containing opium or any of its derivatives; the most common ones are codeine, heroin, methadone, and morphine.
2. hypnotic (def. 2).
endogenous o's endorphins and enkephalins that are released by the body as a defense against pain or during physical exercise, deep relaxation, sexual activity, crying, and laughing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·pi·ate

(ō'pē-āt),
Any preparation or derivative of opium.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

opiate

(ō′pē-ĭt, -āt′)
n.
1. Any of various analgesic, narcotic drugs derived from the opium poppy, such as morphine or codeine.
2. See opioid.
3. Something that dulls the senses and induces relaxation or torpor.
adj.
1.
a. Containing opium or any of its derivatives.
b. Resembling opium or its derivatives in activity.
2. Inducing sleep or sedation; soporific.
3. Causing dullness or apathy; deadening.
tr.v. (-āt′) opi·ated, opi·ating, opi·ates
1. To subject to the action of an opiate.
2. To dull or deaden as if with a narcotic drug.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

opiate

Any natural–eg, opium semi-synthetic–eg, morphine or synthetic–eg, fentanyl, usually alkaloid narcotic agent with opium-like activity. See Drug screening, Narcotic.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

o·pi·ate

(ō'pē-ăt)
Any preparation or derivative of opium.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

opiate

a narcotic substance derived from opium.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Opiate

Any narcotic analgesic derived from a natural source, such as morphine from the opium poppy.
Mentioned in: Methadone
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·pi·ate

(ō'pē-ăt)
Any preparation or derivative of opium.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: The current findings represent the first step toward an improved system, as many women who become pregnant while addicted to opiate drugs desire to detox, but aren't given the option.
It adds: "That would be metabolised into morphine and thus not distinguishable from opiate drugs such as heroin."
The suit claims Blackburn was negligent in prescribing Bennett "dangerous doses" of addictive opiate drugs that he should have known could interact dangerously with other drugs that Bennett had been prescribed.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- About one baby is born every hour addicted to opiate drugs in the United States, according to new research from University of Michigan physicians.
DETECTIVES are investigating after opiate drugs were stolen from Huddersfield Royal Infirmary.
A GP who was using false names to obtain prescriptions for opiate drugs for personal use was also caught, as was a part-time administrative worker who claimed pounds 40,000 in fraudulent overtime.
* In addition to toxicity, loss of efficacy of some opiate drugs may occur as a result of metabolic inhibition or induction by psychotropic medications.
These receptors are part of the pain-dulling opioid system but are not the same receptors that addictive opiate drugs target.
Morphine and other opiate drugs target this system and remain the most effective class of strong pain medication.
We apologize to users of our newest Clinical Laboratory Reference guide who may have discovered an error on page 12 where the columns to the right of the opiate drugs Duragesic and Atiq should have been moved one column to the right: 0.2-1 ng/mL (C)(4) should be under the category Urine cut-off points for reporting positive or limit of quantitation.
We are also working toward the synthesis of codeine and other opiate drugs more efficiently and economically in controlled bioprocessing facilities," says Facchini.