operon

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operon

 [op´er-on]
a segment of a chromosome comprising an operator gene and closely linked structural genes having related functions, the activity of the latter being controlled by the operator gene through its interaction with a regulator gene.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

op·er·on

(op'ĕr-on),
A genetic functional unit that controls production of a messenger RNA; it consists of an operator gene and two or more structural genes located in sequence in the cis position on one chromosome.
[L. operor, to work, act, + -on]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

operon

(ŏp′ə-rŏn′)
n.
A unit of genetic material that functions in a coordinated manner by means of an operator, a promoter, and one or more structural genes that are transcribed together.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

operon

A row of consecutive genes on a chromosome that operates as a functional unit. The structural genes in the operon are preceded by two regulatory sites occupied by regulatory genes, the promoter and the operator. These are essential for the expression of the operon. The genes in an operon have related functions that occur sequentially. All the genes in the operon are turned on and off together. All are transcribed into one large segment of MESSENGER RNA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

operon

a genetic unit comprising a set of structural genes that is coordinately expressed. see OPERON MODEL.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

op·er·on

(op'ĕr-on)
A genetic functional unit that controls production of a messenger RNA.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
cloacae strain Y546 demonstrated that the strain harbored a large plasmid carrying a variety of gene clusters and genes, such as heavy metal resistance gene clusters (e.g., thepco, ars, ter, and ttr operons), conferring resistance to antimicrobials.
Altogether, it has been proved that the close associations exist between most of the operons, genes, or sRNAs within URHP and adaptability or virulence of H.
coli synthetic operons using RBS modulation and fluorescent reporters," ACS Synthetic Biology, vol.
Although bcs operons are widespread amongst bacteria [39], only DC3000 has a complete wss operon including the acetylation-associated genes wssF-I, whilst KT2440 has a truncated wssA-E operon (see the Pseudomonas Genome Database [68]), and both have been shown to express cellulose experimentally [36] (in contrast, PA01 and Pf0-1 do not contain bcs operons and utilise other matrix components in their biofilms [77, 78]).
76),133) In the presence of glucose, the intracellular concentration of the inducers increase, which interact with Cra to prevent its binding to the target operons. On the other hand, the genes activated by Cra is subject to regulation through the control of Cra level.
In addition, scientists can concentrate on the contributions of Fur-regulated operons to cell physiology that have not been systematically assessed.
ToxT inhibits mshA transcription by binding to three binding sites within the msh operon (29).
This element represents a transcription start signal yielding leaderless transcripts having no SD region and is found upstream of isolated genes and first genes in operons in Pyrobaculum aerophilum (Slupska et al., 2001) and Sulfolobu s solfataricus (Tolstrup et al., 2000; She et al., 2001).
marcescens genes to a bacterial luciferase operon. The resulting mutants express light in proportion to cell number during exponential growth.
The most extensively studied genes are from the nifHDK operon, which is contiguous in most cyanobacteria.
The finding that the gene encoding prolyl tRNA synthetase in Sulfolobus sulfotaricus is located immediately downstream from the operon encoding the archaeal coupling factor ATPase (Mark Regan and Christoph Sensen, Dalhousie University; pers.