omnivore

(redirected from Omnivory)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

omnivore

(ŏm′nə-vôr′)
n.
An omnivorous animal: "Humans are quintessential omnivores" (Paul Rozin).

omnivore

an organism feeding on both animals and plants. For example, humans have teeth adapted to chewing both types of material. See also CARNIVORE.

omnivore

an omnivorous animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, our results reinforce the idea that "food chain" omnivory (consumers feeding on more than one trophic level, like seastars feeding on mussels and whelks; Fig.
At the very least, it is important to investigate whether the dissipation effect would still occur in judgments about a more complex food web, such as one with marked omnivory (Pimm, 1982) and this is also a goal for future research.
Omnivory can be a substantial advantage for invasive species; even if the rate of mass increase is modest, the numerous potential food sources should allow young snails to survive for long periods of time, perhaps until a more favorable food resource germinates or otherwise becomes available.
Sea urchins are often described as herbivorous, but omnivory seems to be the most common feeding habit.
Feeding behavior was described by the Omnivory Index (OI); it was calculated as the variance of the trophic levels of a consumer's preys (Christensen & Pauly 1992).
Based on this characterisation of omnivory, it must be emphasised that these crabs would cross the trophic relationships, thus promoting the stability and complexity of the system (Diehl, 2003; Eubanks et al.
Thus, omnivory has been suggested to be one key factor resulting in success of mammals in cities and suburbs (Garber, 1987).
No evidence of strict granivory by small mammals has been found in Australian, South African or South American deserts, where the most frequent dietary strategies are omnivory, insectivory and herbivory (e.