olfactory cortex

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pir·i·form cor·tex

the olfactory cortex, corresponding to the rostral half of the uncus; receiving its major afferents from the olfactory bulb, it is classified as allocortex.
See also: cerebral cortex.

olfactory cortex

Etymology: L, olfactus, sense of smell, cortex, bark
the part of the cerebral cortex, including the pyriform lobe and the hippocampus formation, that is concerned with the sense of smell. Also called archeocortex.

olfactory cortex

The portion of the cerebral cortex concerned with the sense of smell. It includes the piriform lobe and the hippocampal formation.
See also: cortex
References in periodicals archive ?
The olfactory system plays an important role in chemical communication in intraspecific and interspecific interactions, and interactions between organisms and environment, including mate searches (e.
Remarkably, the associated central neurons of the olfactory system are also able to regenerate.
Each oil triggers the olfactory system with unique combinations of chemicals.
The olfactory system is given a treat similar to opening a bottle of Hoppes #9.
Evocative, provocative and totally seductive, fragrance stimulates our most primitive sense and can whisk you back to a happier time or place in your life as your olfactory system kicks in and suddenly you find your memory retention is no longer a challenge.
Mammals respond to volatile substances through two different olfactory systems: the Main Olfactory System (MOS) and the Accessory Olfactory System (AOS).
The olfactory system undergoes continuous replacement of sensory neurons.
A unique cell within the olfactory system is a specialized glial cell called the olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC).
Essential oils are absorbed either through the skin or the olfactory system (smelling).
It is conceivable that subsequent dissolution in the olfactory system occurs.
Wild deer, or any game animal for that matter, with a sophisticated olfactory system, associate human and human related scents such as the material odors of rubber and leather with danger.
The receptors for the olfactory system are stimulated not only when we inhale through our nose but also during eating when molecules in the foods reach the receptors by passing from the oral cavity through the nasal pharynx.